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A deer eats the tops of flowering plants.
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Plant Flowering Bulbs That Deer And Rabbits Won't Consider A Salad Bar

It seems you wait all winter for some colorful flowers to bloom and then the deer and rabbits eat them all first! When it comes to flowering bulbs, there are preventive measures to avoid this.

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Brave Little State

This black and white photo, thought to have been taken in a mill in Winooski, includes a caption suggesting that the man's name is Abair.
Vermont Historical Society

The History Of French Canadian Immigration In Vermont

We explore an aspect of the state's history that some say is overlooked — and answer listener questions about Anglicized names and discrimination — in this encore episode of Brave Little State.

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Subscribe to The Frequency | A Daily News Podcast From VPR

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Live Coverage: Coronavirus In Vermont

Daily updates from the VPR newsroom on the coronavirus pandemic

Duke University in North Carolina has announced that it will require students to have a COVID-19 vaccine when they return this fall. And the list of campuses with such policies is growing.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

All over Vermont small, family-owned sugarhouses lie tucked into hillsides. Some haven’t been used in decades and at others, families are still producing maple syrup like they have for generations.

A tractor with a line of cars behind it on a curving road next to a fallow field against a blue sky
Elodie Reed / VPR

Vermont reporters provide a roundup of top news takeaways about the coronavirus and more for Friday, April 9.

President Biden is pushing hard to get more Americans to buy electric vehicles to rein in global warming and spur domestic manufacturing.

The $2 trillion infrastructure plan he is trying to sell to Congress includes about $174 billion to boost electric vehicle sales and production — more than the president proposes spending on roads and bridges.

Racism is a scourge in American society. It's also a serious public health threat, according to the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In a statement released Thursday, Dr. Rochelle Walensky pointed to the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on communities of color, as seen in case numbers, deaths and social consequence.

Vaccine "passports" are making headlines and eliciting emergency measures by governors in a handful of states.

So what are these credentials, exactly, and what are they used for?

What is a vaccine passport?

It's a credential that can be used to show that a person has been vaccinated. The same technology can be used to show a person's coronavirus test results. It's a way to demonstrate a person's health status, generally through a smartphone app or a QR code that has been printed.

Updated April 8, 2021 at 4:00 PM ET

Declaring U.S. gun violence an "epidemic" and "an international embarrassment," President Biden outlined actions to regulate certain firearms and to try to prevent gun violence after a spate of mass shootings in recent weeks and pressure from advocates.

"This is an epidemic, for God's sake, and it has to stop," Biden said.

A man wearing a t-shirt and fishing vest leans against a wooden railing, with his pole out over the placid river. There are no leaves on the trees in the backdrop and the ski is blue.
Elodie Reed / VPR

Vermont reporters provide a roundup of top news takeaways about the coronavirus and other news for Thursday, April 8.

Black and white photo showing hands holding a small house made out of cardboard
adl21 / iStock

A recent report conducted by Vermont Network examined the cost of domestic and sexual violence for the state -- specifically through public expenditures. This hour, we speak with members from Vermont Network about what the report says, what resources Vermonters are in need of and the call-to-action required to change the narrative around violence. 

Joyce Ann Kraner is eager for the pandemic to end and for life to get back to normal. Kraner, 49, wants to be able to hug her mother, who lives in a nursing home.

But she says she has no plans to get the vaccine, even though it's widely available in her community of Murfreesboro, Tenn. "I feel like I'm healthy," she says.

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Get up to speed on COVID-19 and other news Vermont is talking about. Add our daily email news briefing, 'The Frequency,' to your morning routine.

2020 Community Impact Report

In a year of unfathomable challenges, you trusted VPR to be your source of truth, connection and comfort. Strong community support helped us to not only maintain service in 2020, but to expand it.

Eye On The Sky

Your Vaccine Questions, Answered

Get answers to frequently asked questions about the COVID-19 vaccine and Vermont's roll out and timeline.

Inside VPR

VPR will feature audio of Vermonters reading their own poetry on the air throughout April.
Pixabay

Between The Lines: Poetry Moments For Vermonters, By Vermonters

In collaboration with the Vermont Arts Council and Vermont Humanities , VPR invites community members to submit recordings of themselves reading short, original poems in celebration of National Poetry Month.

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EVENTS - Yes, You CAN Sing!

April 18 at 4:00 p.m.

Don't think you can sing to save your life? Actually, yes, you CAN! Discover your singing voice with Helen Lyons and Linda Radtke!

Remote Learning Resources

But Why Learning Guides

But Why is here to help as we start an unusual school year. We've created learning guides to complement our recent episodes.

But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids

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Why Do We Compete?

Have you ever felt competitive with a friend or a sibling? Competition comes up in a lot of different ways in life. Maybe you're running a race with a friend and you want to beat them! Maybe you're trying to play a song without making a mistake and you're competing against yourself.

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