The Mueller Report

READ: The Mueller Report, With Redactions

Attorney General William Barr has released a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 election to Congress and the public. The special counsel spent nearly two years investigating attacks on the 2016 presidential election and whether the Trump campaign coordinated with the Russians behind it. » Read the roughly 400-page report. Mueller also was tasked with looking into "any matters that arose or may arise directly from the investigation."...

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Dr. Bryan Smith, standing, talks with a nurse at Gifford Medical Center in Randolph.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A recent report found that eight the state's 14 hospitals fell short of revenue forecasts in 2018. Gifford Medical Center officials say a workforce shortage is one of the biggest challenges, and it’s having a serious effect on the bottom line.

Mourners lay flowers on a wall at the Botanical Gardens in Christchurch, New Zealand, Monday, March 18, 2019.
Vincent Thian / AP

Last month, the Addison Independent published a poem by Narges Anzali, a 13-year-old eighth grader who attends Middlebury Union Middle School. The poem is titled simply: "To All The People Who Hate Muslims."

Special counsel Robert Mueller's redacted report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election was released Thursday, April 18, 2019.
Jon Elswick / AP

A redacted version of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report on the Trump-Russia investigation was released Thursday, April 18. We're talking with Vermont journalist and author Garrett Graff, who's reported on Mueller for more than a decade and followed the Special Counsel from the beginning, on what we've learned from reading Mueller's own words and seeing the redacted report.

Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman in the House Chamber in 2016. Lt. Gov. Zuckerman joins "Vermont Edition" to discuss the current legislative session and the status of certain priorities so far in Montpelier.
Angela Evancie / VPR

Live call-in discussion: The Vermont legislative sessions has passed its midpoint, and we’re talking with Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman about where some of his key priorities for the session — like paid family leave and a tax-and-regulate plan for marijuana — stand in the legislature.

Exterior of the Vermont Supreme Court.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

Vermont's highest court heard arguments Wednesday over whether Burlington Police can charge a fee to someone who wants to look at body camera footage.

The long and winding road for Act 46 is nearing its final deadline. But questions and court decisions are still in play that could change the final outcomes.
ErikaMitchell / iStock

Four years after it was signed, the Act 46 school district consolidation law is nearing its final deadline on July 1. But there are court cases, refusals by school districts to merge and many questions swirling around the remaining mergers. We get updates and answers on these issues.

A child looks on as a duo play the 1988 "Operation Thunderbolt" arcade game during the April 7, 2019 opening of the "Dream Machine II Arcade Exhibit" in Rutland.
Nick Grandchamp, courtesy

You're just as likely to run into a game of Pac-Man or Street Fighter II today in the basement of a diehard collector of retro 1980s arcade games as you are to play one in the corner of a pizza parlor or bowling alley. But one Rutland collector is putting more than a dozen of the machines together in a pop-up exhibit showcasing the games, their history and the value of playing together.

Sen. Bernie Sanders speaks a podium outside in Pittsburgh, Penn.
Keith Srakocic / Associated Press

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont is back on the presidential campaign trail, and he’s focusing on states that went for Donald Trump in the 2016 election. This past weekend, Sanders swung through Wisconsin, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Pennsylvania.

Seven Days staff writer and political editor Paul Heintz went along on that trip, and his account is the cover story of the paper's issue this week.

A partial view of a care tire set against a black background.
nicolas_ / iStock

The Agency of Transportation wants Vermont to be a testing site for self-driving cars, but there’s a debate in the Statehouse right now over how much oversight towns should have when the technology is tested on public roads.

We're talking about the science of fentanyl and its effects on the body.
Rick Bowmer / AP

The synthetic opioid fentanyl is causing deadly overdoses to spike across the country. But while concerns have been raised about accidental exposure, it is incredibly unlikely that chance contact with the substance through skin or inhalation can be toxic. We're talking about the science behind fentanyl and how it acts on the body, plus which dangers are real and which are overblown.

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More than 50 commentators provide perspective and opinion about current events, topics of interest, and often showcase the work of writers and storytellers.

Brave Little State

Michael and Stacy Lee stand in the front yard of their white, one-story ranch just after sunset in early spring.
Angela Evancie / VPR

How Is Climate Change Affecting Vermont Right Now?

We know the predictions are dire; we know there are urgent conversations to be had about policy. But to answer this listener question, we stay focused on the present.

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VPR Blog

'Live From The Fort' collaborates with the Flynn Center's New Voices Project to bring you a showcase of West African music from Sabouyouma on May 2, 2019.
Courtesy / Jesse Rosenfield

New Voices, Live From The Fort: Sabouyouma

VPR's Live From The Fort returns in collaboration with the Flynn Center’s New Voices Project , showcasing world musical traditions nestled in and around the Queen City.

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Event: New Voices, Live From The Fort

Join us on May 2 to hear how Sabouyouma uses the balafon and polyrhythmic grooves to bring us on a cultural journey to West Africa, uncovering the roots of jazz, funk and blues.

But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids

istock
Keith Szafranski

"Do Skunks Like Their Own Smell?" And Other Stumpers!

Good Question! In this episode of But Why , we answer some questions that make us say, huh? Why do shoes get stinky? Why are little brothers so annoying? Also, why don't tow trucks have sirens?

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VPR Classical

All images U.S. Public Domain - Collage by James Stewart / Vermont Public Radio

Alchemy of Genius: A J.S. Bach and Chopin Musical Pairing.

The idea for this project was brought to VPR by Paul Orgel, a well-known Vermont pianist, and a regular guest on our Live Performance Series starting back on Walter Parker’s show in the 1980s, when the studio was in Windsor. Performing the complete Chopin Nocturnes and Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier Book II are both projects of Paul’s, and we were delighted to have him play and record some of them on our wonderful, still new, Steinway D that he and pianist Simone Dinnerstein helped choose for the station at the Steinway factory in New York.

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My Heart Still Beats

A six-part series featuring conversation and original writing from Vermont's recovery community.

Get The Frequency

VPR's News Email, Every Weekday Morning

Eye On The Sky

A 5-part podcast about a school shooting that didn't happen, and the surprising things that did.