How the events of last year changed Vermont schools and law enforcement

NPR News

'I Can Exist Here': On Gender Identity, Some Colleges Are Opening Up

Take a look at a class roster at the University of Vermont. You'll see the usual stuff there — last name, student ID and class year. But you'll also see something else. Next to some names, there are pronouns: "he" or "she," but also the gender non-specific "they" or "ze." They may seem like a few more words on paper, but for some students, like Jeane Robles, having pronouns on the roster means a lot. "Just having the option to do that makes me feel like I can exist here," says Robles, a...

Read More

Subscribe To The VPR News Podcast

Warmer winters mean ticks are taking a toll on the moose population. We're featuring some of our recent coverage of the local impacts on climate change.
Elliot Black / flickr

Vermont Edition is featuring some of our recent coverage of climate change on our region - including significant changes for weather, wildlife and agriculture. Plus: discussion of what we can do on local and global levels to combat climate change and effectively deal with its effects.

The melty weather in New Hampshire this winter has been a big problem for some kinds of seasonal recreation -- and it’s all part of a long-term warming trend.

As this season comes to an end, some of the region's favorite pastimes are preparing for an uncertain future.

Windblown Cross Country Skiing and Snowshoeing is tucked into the hills of New Ipswich, New Hampshire, not far from the Massachusetts border.

Forest therapy guide Duncan Murdoch takes in his surroundings in Arms Forest in Burlington.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

Forest bathing is an English interpretation of the Japanese term shinrin-yoku and it is the idea that spending time in nature in an alert but relaxed manner has healing and rejuvenating benefits. But why, in a state where many Vermonters already feel connected to the natural landscape around them, would someone pay to go on a forest bathing excursion with a forest therapy guide? Vermont Edition went to find out.

Nina Keck / VPR

It’s been almost 50 years since there has been a hotel in downtown Rutland. Because of the recent federal government shutdown, it's taking longer than expected to find out if the city will get a new one.

A sign that says Welcome to the Childbirth Center and the Springfield Hospital logo, next to a black and white photo of an adult hand making a heart around baby feet.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The Springfield Hospital board of trustees voted Tuesday to close the hospital's child-birthing unit, as it tries to shave $6.5 million off this year’s budget.

Failure to recognize faces - even of those familiar to a person - is called prosopagnosia or face blindness and it affects about two percent of the population.
Missbobbit / iStock

Most of us take for granted the ability to recognize the faces of our friends and loved ones. But for about two percent of individuals, it isn't that easy. They have a condition called prosopagnosia or face blindness. Brad Duchaine, Dartmouth College professor of psychological and brain sciences, joins us to discuss the latest research in this field.

A headshot of Dartmouth College professor Marcelo Gleiser
Dartmouth College

Dartmouth College professor of physics and astronomy Marcelo Gleiser has won the prestigious Templeton Prize. Gleiser was awarded the 2019 prize for his work blending hard science with deep spirituality, examining how the study of physics can engage in the world of the unseen.

Brian Jenkins/UVM Athletics

When Ben Shungu weighed his options for playing college basketball three years ago coming out of Rice Memorial High School, his choices were limited.

"The Moth" offers storytellers the opportunity to sharpen their skills in front of a live audience. Marlon "Big Fish" Fisher is shown hosting a local Moth event.
Ty Robertson / VPR FILE

Everyone has interesting things happen to them - at least once in a while - but not everyone knows how to tell a good story about their experiences. Susanne Schmidt is someone who does. She's a storyteller and regional producer of The Moth, which puts on storytelling events across the country.

Hermitage Trio Live

Mar 19, 2019
Lisa-Marie Mazzucco / www.hermitagepianotrio.com

The Hermitage Piano Trio from Russia visits VPR's Stetson Studio One for a live performance in advance of their Lane Series concert Friday evening.

Listen Friday March 22 at 11 a.m.

Pages

Brave Little State

And illustration of a neighborhood.
filo / iStockphoto.com

Why Does Vermont Have Such A Housing Crunch?

What are the causes of Vermont’s tight housing market — and why aren’t things getting better?

Read More

My Heart Still Beats

A six-part series featuring conversation and original writing from Vermont's recovery community.

More than 50 commentators provide perspective and opinion about current events, topics of interest, and often showcase the work of writers and storytellers.

VPR Blog

When listeners help VPR raise $425,000 in March, we'll be able to skip the drive in June!
Illustration by Lara Dickson / For VPR

All The Funding In March, Skip The Drive In June

In our effort to bring you more news and music with less on-air fundraising, VPR is about to do something bold: when you help us meet our $425,000 goal during the month of March, we'll skip the drive in June.

Read More

Enter To Win!

March Nor'easter: Fancy A Getaway?

So much for spring! But contribute to VPR now and you'll be automatically entered to win our grand prize: a $2,000 travel package to visit anywhere in the world!

But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids

Melody Bodette / VPR

How Is But Why Made? What Is Sound?

In this episode, we're answering your questions about...us! Why do you make But Why? How are podcasts made? And we're answering questions about the physics of sound and radio.

Read More

VPR Classical

All images U.S. Public Domain - Collage by James Stewart / Vermont Public Radio

Alchemy of Genius: A J.S. Bach and Chopin Musical Pairing.

The idea for this project was brought to VPR by Paul Orgel, a well-known Vermont pianist, and a regular guest on our Live Performance Series starting back on Walter Parker’s show in the 1980s, when the studio was in Windsor. Performing the complete Chopin Nocturnes and Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier Book II are both projects of Paul’s, and we were delighted to have him play and record some of them on our wonderful, still new, Steinway D that he and pianist Simone Dinnerstein helped choose for the station at the Steinway factory in New York.

Read More

Get The Frequency

VPR's News Email, Every Weekday Morning

Eye On The Sky