House Judiciary Committee Approves 2 Articles Of Impeachment Against Trump

Updated at 12:12 p.m. ET The House Judiciary Committee on Friday approved two articles of impeachment against President Trump, making him the fourth president in American history to face impeachment. In contrast to Thursday's contentious back-and-forth between the two parties, Friday's session was devoid of rancor, or even any debate. Immediately after calling the session to order, Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., ordered two votes, one for each article. Both were...

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A Joint Investigation From VPR & Seven Days

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James Buck / For Seven Days & VPR

'Worse For Care': When Eldercare Homes Flout The Rules, Managers Aren't Held Responsible

In early 2014, a caller to the Vermont Department of Disabilities, Aging and Independent Living reported that at Owen House, a residential care home in Fair Haven, a resident's foot was "rotting from the inside out" due to neuropathy and poor care.

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Two people look at building plans laid out on a table.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

A vacant lot in downtown Morrisville could soon be the site of a 24-unit affordable housing project.

A stage with musicians on it.
Pete Checchia/Allen Cohen / Courtesy of Marlboro Music Festival

Organizers of the Marlboro Music Festival say the festival will remain on the Marlboro College campus even if the school closes at the end of this academic year.

Tucked inside a must-pass defense bill expected to make its way through the Republican-controlled Senate next week is a sweeping policy change: 12 weeks of paid parental leave for all 2.1 million federal employees.

It's not a surprise that Carolyn Maloney, a Democratic congresswoman from New York, would be celebrating the move. She's been working to get it passed for two decades, after her own experience in the workplace.

As the impeachment inquiry against President Trump has unfolded, one name in particular has surfaced over and over again in both private hearing transcripts and public testimony: the president's personal lawyer, Rudolph Giuliani.

Congressional testimony has placed Giuliani at the center of the Ukraine affair, with multiple witnesses telling House investigators that he helped spearhead an irregular diplomatic channel between the U.S. and Ukraine.

A laptop computer open to TuitionTracker.org
Elodie Reed / VPR

One of the first things students embarking on a college search learn is just how expensive college tuition can be. The sticker price for a single year's tuition at private colleges and universities can top $50,000, not including costs such as books and on-campus room and board.

But what students also quickly learn is that, between grants, scholarships and need-based financial aid, many students don't pay the sticker price. In fact, there are some schools where almost no students pay the advertised price.

So how is a potential college student supposed to know what a school will charge them before they apply?

Updated at 2:40 p.m. ET

Practically everyone is frustrated by high prescription drug prices. Voters have made clear they want Congress to do something about them.

On Thursday, the House of Representatives passed a bill that tries to deliver on that. It was a mostly party line vote — all Democrats voted to pass it, along with two Republicans.

Updated at 11:38 p.m. ET

Planned votes on two articles of impeachment against President Trump were delayed late Thursday night by Rep. Jerry Nadler, the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee. He asked members to consider how they want to vote and to reconvene at 10 a.m. Friday.

Ranking minority member Rep. Doug Collins and others protested that Nadler had upset the committee's plans without consulting them.

The Judiciary Committee had sparred for more than 12 hours Thursday ahead of expected votes.

A man sitting in the woods.
John Dillon / VPR

The Nature Conservancy says its innovative plan to use a Vermont forest to help reduce greenhouse gas pollution in California did not turn out as hoped after a timber inventory showed the project was not economically feasible.

Rep. Sarah Copeland Hanzas outside the Vermont Statehouse.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

A group of Vermont lawmakers plan to push forward significant legislation in the next session aimed at reducing Vermont's carbon emissions. The so-called "climate solutions caucus" has been holding public forums around the state in recent weeks to speak with Vermonters about how they want to see climate change addressed at the Statehouse.

Updated at 10:50 p.m. ET

House Democrats began work on completing their articles of impeachment against President Trump Wednesday evening, setting the stage for a vote by the full House.

The Judiciary Committee convened to amend the impeachment legislation introduced Tuesday by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., with its chairman, Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., calling the facts against Trump "overwhelming" and that Congress must act now to protect the integrity of U.S. election and its national security.

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Brave Little State

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Elodie Reed / VPR

How Can Vermonters Drive Less?

For a state that calls itself green, Vermont sure has a lot of drivers. So what can be done?

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Thirsty? Check Out The New VPR Stainless Canteen

Show your support for VPR while keeping your cocoa hot or your water cold! Our new 22 oz. double wall vacuum construction stainless steel canteen is available for a gift of $125 or $10/month!

Eye On The Sky

VPR Blog

Now more than ever, your support is essential.
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Now More Than Ever, Your Support Is Essential

Now more than ever, our community needs access to trustworthy news and information. And now more than ever, VPR needs your investment to keep this essential service strong. Be one of 5,000 listeners to join us with a gift during our December membership drive and add your voice to civil dialogue in our community.

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But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids

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Why Are Some Words 'Bad'?

In this episode, we tackle why some words are considered bad. Plus: Why do people say bad words? Why aren't kids allowed to say cuss words? Why is the middle finger bad? Adults, don't worry: we won't actually be using any bad words in this episode!

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A Beginner's Guide To Podcasts

A Beginner's Guide To Podcasts

Not sure how the whole podcasting thing works? We're here to help.