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U.S. Recommends Pausing Use Of Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Over Blood Clot Concerns

Updated April 13, 2021 at 11:31 AM ET The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday they are recommending a "pause" in the use of the single-dose Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine out of an "abundance of caution" while a review of reports of rare, potentially dangerous blood clots is conducted. In a joint statement on Tuesday, the two agencies said they are "reviewing data involving six reported U.S. cases of a rare and severe type of...

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Brave Little State

This black and white photo, thought to have been taken in a mill in Winooski, includes a caption suggesting that the man's name is Abair.
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The History Of French Canadian Immigration In Vermont

We explore an aspect of the state's history that some say is overlooked — and answer listener questions about Anglicized names and discrimination — in this encore episode of Brave Little State.

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Live Coverage: Coronavirus In Vermont

Daily updates from the VPR newsroom on the coronavirus pandemic

Rubber gloved hands hold a syringe
Mary Altaffer / Associated Press File

All state-run clinics set up to administer the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine today in Vermont have been canceled. Gov. Phil Scott announced in a tweet this morning the state was suspending the clinics "out of an abundance of caution," adding that those expecting the vaccine are being contacted by health officials to reschedule appointments. More information is expected at a 12 p.m. press briefing.

The decision will not affect planned vaccinations for the two other vaccines, from Moderna and Pfizer.

People infected with the U.K. variant of the coronavirus didn't experience more severe symptoms and weren't more likely to die from this particular strain, according to a new study of hospitalized patients published Monday.

The strain, called the B.1.1.7 variant, remains more contagious than original strains of the virus however, according to the study in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Days after declaring racism a serious public health threat, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a pair of studies further quantifying the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on communities of color.

The studies, published Monday in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, examine trends in racial and ethnic disparities in hospitalizations and emergency room visits associated with COVID-19 in 2020.

Ginger Eatman thought she was safe after getting her second COVID-19 vaccination in February. But she kept wearing her mask, using hand sanitizer and wiping down the carts at the grocery store anyway. A few weeks later, she noticed a scratchy throat.

"By Wednesday morning, St. Patrick's Day, I was sick. I had congestion — a lot of congestion — and some coughing," says Eatman, 73, of Dallas, Ga.

Her doctor thought her symptoms might be allergies. But Eatman started feeling sicker. And then she suddenly lost her sense of smell. She even tried her strong perfume. Nothing.

Montreal skyline.
Mlenny / iStock

Protests in Montreal turned raucous Sunday night as the city pushed up its curfew from 9:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. The stricter measures come as Quebec and much of Canada see spiking COVID-19 case numbers and a vaccine rollout that's much slower than here in the U.S.

Updated April 12, 2021 at 10:44 PM ET

The police officer said to have fatally shot Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old Black man killed in what started as a traffic stop on Sunday, has been identified as Kim Potter.

Sunrise over the backdrop of the mountains, looking out across a pasture at an undercast.
Elodie Reed / VPR

Vermont reporters provide a roundup of top news takeaways about the coronavirus and more for Monday, April 12.

Editor's note: A version of this comic was originally published in December 2020.

A tree outside a single-story building.
Elodie Reed / VPR File

The trauma of the pandemic has affected many: health care workers, first responders, even grocery store clerks. Hospice workers - who deal with death every day - were heavily affected.

A deer eats the tops of flowering plants.
arlutz73

It seems you wait all winter for some colorful flowers to bloom and then the deer and rabbits eat them all first! When it comes to flowering bulbs, there are preventive measures to avoid this.

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Apr. 18 | Yes, You CAN Sing!

Don't think you can sing to save your life? Actually, yes, you CAN! Discover your singing voice with Helen Lyons and Linda Radtke. Join us for a virtual singing lesson!

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Remote Learning Resources

But Why Learning Guides

But Why is here to help as we start an unusual school year. We've created learning guides to complement our recent episodes.

But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids

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Why Do We Compete?

Have you ever felt competitive with a friend or a sibling? Competition comes up in a lot of different ways in life. Maybe you're running a race with a friend and you want to beat them! Maybe you're trying to play a song without making a mistake and you're competing against yourself.

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