How the events of last year changed Vermont schools and law enforcement

NPR News

'I Can Exist Here': On Gender Identity, Some Colleges Are Opening Up

Take a look at a class roster at the University of Vermont. You'll see the usual stuff there — last name, student ID and class year. But you'll also see something else. Next to some names, there are pronouns: "he" or "she," but also the gender non-specific "they" or "ze." They may seem like a few more words on paper, but for some students, like Jeane Robles, having pronouns on the roster means a lot. "Just having the option to do that makes me feel like I can exist here," says Robles, a...

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An artistically lit basketball.
GoodLifeStudio / iStock

The University of Vermont’s men’s basketball team is set to face Florida State University in the first round of the NCAA March Madness tournament. The Catamounts are set to tip off at 2 p.m. Thursday at the XL Center in Hartford, Connecticut. 

All Images Public Domain - Collage by James Stewart

We are continuing to celebrate the life and music of J.S. Bach and Chopin, listening to excerpts from a recent concert I hosted with pianist Paul Orgel in VPR’s Stetson Studio One while also featuring highlights from an interview I had with pianist and Chopin scholar Marjan Kiepura. You can listen to all of Paul Orgel’s performances from “The Alchemy of Genius” pairing Nocturnes by Chopin with excerpts from Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier Book II here.

"Vermont Edition" collects interviews from four graphic novelists, featuring work from (clockwise from top left) Jason Lutes, Alison Bechdel, Rachel Lindsay, and James Sturm.
DRAWN AND QUARTERLY / Meg Malone for VPR / RACHEL LINDSAY

A special Vermont Edition collects interviews with cartoonists and graphic novel creators, showcasing local work in the unique art form that presents novel-length stories in a comic strip format. It's a combination of words and images that doesn't shy away from difficult subjects: these Vermont cartoonists tackle mental health, crumbling marriages, world wars and the current political climate.

We're talking potholes.
Andy Arthur / flickr

A rough winter for roads throughout the state means potholes are plentiful and making for some bone-rattling car rides. Experts from the Agency of Transportation join Vermont Edition to talk about how potholes form, how they're fixed and how they can be prevented.

Like much of the known universe — not to mention all that rests beyond it — Marcelo Gleiser eludes straightforward classification. He is a theoretical physicist, a cosmologist, an Ivy League professor, an ultramarathon runner, an author, a blogger and book reviewer for NPR, a starry-eyed seeker of truth and a gimlet-eyed realist about just how much (or how little) of it he'll find in his lifetime.

Tunbridge Planning Commission member Ingrid Van Steamburg sits before a table with different color nametags, to correspond with different towns.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

It's been almost a year since Utah developer David Hall announced that he would be giving up on his plan to build a 5,000-acre "sustainable community," designed for up to 20,000 people, in the Upper Valley.

Now people from the four towns that pushed back on the development are trying to figure out what's next, working together to come up with regional solutions to many of the same issues other rural communities around Vermont face.

Researchers from Mount Holyoke College and UMass Amherst are among the teams chosen by NASA to study moon rocks gathered during Apollo missions 50 years ago. These rock samples haven't been unsealed before now. 

Bhuwan Sharma sits at a desk at Burlington Employment Agency.
Bayla Metzger / VPR

The Burlington area is a hub for refugees and immigrants in Vermont, but area officials and businesses are concerned about this population shrinking. Recent federal restrictions have limited the number of refugees coming to the state and there's another problem too: some New Americans are choosing to leave Vermont.

A snow-covered Vermont Statehouse, with an American and Vermont flag flying in front.
Oliver Parini / For VPR

This past Town Meeting Day, voters in South Burlington backed a plan to tax rental cars. However in a case like this, where local residents vote to make a change to their town charter, it still needs to be approved by the Vermont Legislature before it can go into effect. So why is that? And might that process change? 

The Barge Canal on Pine Street in Burlington is one of 14 Superfund cleanup sites in Vermont.
Alden Pellett / Associated Press/File

They were everything from tanneries to landfills to copper mines. They are Vermont's 14 Superfund sites; locations that were so polluted they required a long-term cleanup plan of the hazardous material contaminations. We'll "visit" some of them at a time when the Environmental Protection Agency is doing five-year reviews of six of the sites.

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Brave Little State

And illustration of a neighborhood.
filo / iStockphoto.com

Why Does Vermont Have Such A Housing Crunch?

What are the causes of Vermont’s tight housing market — and why aren’t things getting better?

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My Heart Still Beats

A six-part series featuring conversation and original writing from Vermont's recovery community.

More than 50 commentators provide perspective and opinion about current events, topics of interest, and often showcase the work of writers and storytellers.

VPR Blog

When listeners help VPR raise $425,000 in March, we'll be able to skip the drive in June!
Illustration by Lara Dickson / For VPR

All The Funding In March, Skip The Drive In June

In our effort to bring you more news and music with less on-air fundraising, VPR is about to do something bold: when you help us meet our $425,000 goal during the month of March, we'll skip the drive in June.

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Enter To Win!

March Nor'easter: Fancy A Getaway?

So much for spring! But contribute to VPR now and you'll be automatically entered to win our grand prize: a $2,000 travel package to visit anywhere in the world!

But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids

Melody Bodette / VPR

How Is But Why Made? What Is Sound?

In this episode, we're answering your questions about...us! Why do you make But Why? How are podcasts made? And we're answering questions about the physics of sound and radio.

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VPR Classical

All images U.S. Public Domain - Collage by James Stewart / Vermont Public Radio

Alchemy of Genius: A J.S. Bach and Chopin Musical Pairing.

The idea for this project was brought to VPR by Paul Orgel, a well-known Vermont pianist, and a regular guest on our Live Performance Series starting back on Walter Parker’s show in the 1980s, when the studio was in Windsor. Performing the complete Chopin Nocturnes and Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier Book II are both projects of Paul’s, and we were delighted to have him play and record some of them on our wonderful, still new, Steinway D that he and pianist Simone Dinnerstein helped choose for the station at the Steinway factory in New York.

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