News

Sen. Patrick Leahy talks to reporters at Burlington International Airport Sunday. Leahy says he wants Robert Mueller's report into alleged Russiona interference in the 2016 election to be released in its entirety to Congress and the public.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Attorney General William Barr may have unveiled top-level findings from Robert Mueller’s report into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, but Sen. Patrick Leahy says he won’t be satisfied until the special counsel’s full report is released to the public.

A picture of narcotics seized by police. Some Vermont lawmakers want to decriminalize possession of buprenorphine, an opioid that's often used to treat substance use disorder.
AP/Toby Talbot

The House Judiciary Committee has approved legislation decriminalizing possession of buprenorphine. But some law enforcement officials say non-prescribed use of the drug, which is used to treat opioid use disorder, should remain a crime.

We're talking about the debate over life without parole in Vermont.
powerofforever / iStock

Live call-in discussion: Life in prison with no chance of parole is the harshest punishment possible in Vermont. Some see it as a necessary sentence for the worst crimes, others as an unforgiving punishment devoid of hope of rehabilitation. We're talking about what life without parole means for public safety, rehabilitation and deterrence, and for the cost of the justice system in Vermont.

Warmer winters mean ticks are taking a toll on the moose population. We're featuring some of our recent coverage of the local impacts on climate change.
Elliot Black / flickr

Vermont Edition is featuring some of our recent coverage of climate change on our region - including significant changes for weather, wildlife and agriculture. Plus: discussion of what we can do on local and global levels to combat climate change and effectively deal with its effects.

Forest therapy guide Duncan Murdoch takes in his surroundings in Arms Forest in Burlington.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

Forest bathing is an English interpretation of the Japanese term shinrin-yoku and it is the idea that spending time in nature in an alert but relaxed manner has healing and rejuvenating benefits. But why, in a state where many Vermonters already feel connected to the natural landscape around them, would someone pay to go on a forest bathing excursion with a forest therapy guide? Vermont Edition went to find out.

Nina Keck / VPR

It’s been almost 50 years since there has been a hotel in downtown Rutland. Because of the recent federal government shutdown, it's taking longer than expected to find out if the city will get a new one.

A sign that says Welcome to the Childbirth Center and the Springfield Hospital logo, next to a black and white photo of an adult hand making a heart around baby feet.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The Springfield Hospital board of trustees voted Tuesday to close the hospital's child-birthing unit, as it tries to shave $6.5 million off this year’s budget.

Failure to recognize faces - even of those familiar to a person - is called prosopagnosia or face blindness and it affects about two percent of the population.
Missbobbit / iStock

Most of us take for granted the ability to recognize the faces of our friends and loved ones. But for about two percent of individuals, it isn't that easy. They have a condition called prosopagnosia or face blindness. Brad Duchaine, Dartmouth College professor of psychological and brain sciences, joins us to discuss the latest research in this field.

A headshot of Dartmouth College professor Marcelo Gleiser
Dartmouth College

Dartmouth College professor of physics and astronomy Marcelo Gleiser has won the prestigious Templeton Prize. Gleiser was awarded the 2019 prize for his work blending hard science with deep spirituality, examining how the study of physics can engage in the world of the unseen.

Brian Jenkins/UVM Athletics

When Ben Shungu weighed his options for playing college basketball three years ago coming out of Rice Memorial High School, his choices were limited.

"The Moth" offers storytellers the opportunity to sharpen their skills in front of a live audience. Marlon "Big Fish" Fisher is shown hosting a local Moth event.
Ty Robertson / VPR FILE

Everyone has interesting things happen to them - at least once in a while - but not everyone knows how to tell a good story about their experiences. Susanne Schmidt is someone who does. She's a storyteller and regional producer of The Moth, which puts on storytelling events across the country.

Hermitage Trio Live

Mar 19, 2019
Lisa-Marie Mazzucco / www.hermitagepianotrio.com

The Hermitage Piano Trio from Russia visits VPR's Stetson Studio One for a live performance in advance of their Lane Series concert Friday evening.

Listen Friday March 22 at 11 a.m.

An artistically lit basketball.
GoodLifeStudio / iStock

The University of Vermont’s men’s basketball team is set to face Florida State University in the first round of the NCAA March Madness tournament. The Catamounts are set to tip off at 2 p.m. Thursday at the XL Center in Hartford, Connecticut. 

All Images Public Domain - Collage by James Stewart

We are continuing to celebrate the life and music of J.S. Bach and Chopin, listening to excerpts from a recent concert I hosted with pianist Paul Orgel in VPR’s Stetson Studio One while also featuring highlights from an interview I had with pianist and Chopin scholar Marjan Kiepura. You can listen to all of Paul Orgel’s performances from “The Alchemy of Genius” pairing Nocturnes by Chopin with excerpts from Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier Book II here.

"Vermont Edition" collects interviews from four graphic novelists, featuring work from (clockwise from top left) Jason Lutes, Alison Bechdel, Rachel Lindsay, and James Sturm.
DRAWN AND QUARTERLY / Meg Malone for VPR / RACHEL LINDSAY

A special Vermont Edition collects interviews with cartoonists and graphic novel creators, showcasing local work in the unique art form that presents novel-length stories in a comic strip format. It's a combination of words and images that doesn't shy away from difficult subjects: these Vermont cartoonists tackle mental health, crumbling marriages, world wars and the current political climate.

We're talking potholes.
Andy Arthur / flickr

A rough winter for roads throughout the state means potholes are plentiful and making for some bone-rattling car rides. Experts from the Agency of Transportation join Vermont Edition to talk about how potholes form, how they're fixed and how they can be prevented.

Tunbridge Planning Commission member Ingrid Van Steamburg sits before a table with different color nametags, to correspond with different towns.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

It's been almost a year since Utah developer David Hall announced that he would be giving up on his plan to build a 5,000-acre "sustainable community," designed for up to 20,000 people, in the Upper Valley.

Now people from the four towns that pushed back on the development are trying to figure out what's next, working together to come up with regional solutions to many of the same issues other rural communities around Vermont face.

Bhuwan Sharma sits at a desk at Burlington Employment Agency.
Bayla Metzger / VPR

The Burlington area is a hub for refugees and immigrants in Vermont, but area officials and businesses are concerned about this population shrinking. Recent federal restrictions have limited the number of refugees coming to the state and there's another problem too: some New Americans are choosing to leave Vermont.

A snow-covered Vermont Statehouse, with an American and Vermont flag flying in front.
Oliver Parini / For VPR

This past Town Meeting Day, voters in South Burlington backed a plan to tax rental cars. However in a case like this, where local residents vote to make a change to their town charter, it still needs to be approved by the Vermont Legislature before it can go into effect. So why is that? And might that process change? 

The Barge Canal on Pine Street in Burlington is one of 14 Superfund cleanup sites in Vermont.
Alden Pellett / Associated Press/File

They were everything from tanneries to landfills to copper mines. They are Vermont's 14 Superfund sites; locations that were so polluted they required a long-term cleanup plan of the hazardous material contaminations. We'll "visit" some of them at a time when the Environmental Protection Agency is doing five-year reviews of six of the sites.

Pages