News

The Barge Canal on Pine Street in Burlington is one of 14 Superfund cleanup sites in Vermont.
Alden Pellett / Associated Press/File

Live call-in discussion: They were everything from tanneries to landfills to copper mines. They are Vermont's 14 Superfund sites; locations that were so polluted they required a long-term cleanup plan of the hazardous material contaminations. We'll "visit" some of them at a time when the Environmental Protection Agency is doing five-year reviews of six of the sites.

Montpelier author Katherine Paterson is being recognized for her body of work in children's literature.
courtesy Katherine Paterson

Author Katherine Paterson, who lives in Montpelier, is being recognized for “an exceptional lifetime body of work" by the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Paterson is known for books for kids and young adults like Bridge to Terabithia, The Great Gilly Hopkins, Jacob Have I Loved, and many others. She took home this year’s E.B. White Award—a prize she says has personal significance.

Courtney Adams/UVM Athletics

One of those fates awaits the University of Vermont men’s basketball team Saturday when it hosts the University of Maryland Baltimore County in the championship game of the America East conference tournament. At stake is the league’s automatic bid to the NCAA tournament, a winner-takes-all showdown five months in the making.

A wildlife keeper at VINS shows a barred owl to visitors.
Paul Cooper / flickr

It’s been a rough winter for owls—and the Vermont Institute of Natural Science says it’s mostly affecting young owls experiencing their first winter.

Right As Rain book cover, features two kids sitting next to each other
HarperCollins

Lindsey Stoddard has something in common with Rain, the narrator of her new young adult novel Right As Rain. Like the young girl whose life is uprooted when she abruptly moves from Vermont to New York City's Spanish Harlem neighborhood, Stoddard has experienced a similar locale change as well.

Sen. Patrick Leahy, flanked by Sen. Jon Tester of Montana, left, and Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York, speaks at a February 2019 news conference amid border security negotiations.
Andrew Harnik / AP

Thursday in Washington, Sen. Patrick Leahy voted to block President Donald Trump's emergency declaration on the southern border. We're talking with the Senator about that resolution, security and humanitarian concerns at the Southern border, Sen. Bernie Sanders' 2020 presidential run and more.

A blue sky day and a wide shot of a snowy, frozen lake, with people walking on it in the background.
Henry Epp / VPR

Last week, the National Weather Service in Burlington made it official: Lake Champlain has fully frozen over for the first time since February 2015. However with Thursday temperatures forecast to reach the 50s, the full freeze might not last much longer.

Two women hug among a crowd in a hallway
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Springfield Hospital needs to trim about $6.5 million from the current year budget, and the administration announced recently that the childbirth center may be closed to save money.

President Donald Trump at a podium outside the White House.
Susan Walsh / Associated Press

Vermont is joining more than a dozen states suing the Trump administration over its declaration of a national emergency, which is intended to fund construction of a wall along the U.S.-Mexican border.

Rodney Chayer, of Duxbury, at a public hearing regarding gun legislation at Vermont Technical College in Randolph, Vt.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

About 200 gun rights advocates traveled to Randolph Tuesday evening to weigh in on proposed gun legislation that they say violates their right to bear arms.

Artists Sean (left) Clute and Otto Muller (center) stand among hanging dried stalks of Japanese knotweed with Julian Scott Memorial Gallery director Phillip Robertson.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

A new art exhibit at Northern Vermont University's Johnson campus uses the invasive plant Japanese knotweed to explore concepts of invasiveness and colonization in a multimedia interactive experience.

A scanning electron microscope image of an HIV virus.
Wikimedia Commons

In Vermont, almost 700 people have received care for HIV in the last few years. Vermont Edition spoke to Roy Belcher - an epidemiologist and HIV surveillance coordinator for the state - about what life looks like for Vermonters living with the virus, what has changed and what treatments are available.

A sign that says Green Mountain College and then a building with the name Green Mountain College in the background.
Nina Keck / VPR

Two small liberal arts colleges in Vermont will close at the end of this semester. Once students leave Green Mountain College and Southern Vermont College for the last time this spring, how will those schools go about actually shutting down their campuses?

On "Vermont Edition" we're talking about growing grains and hops, malting barley locally and how nearby farmers are increasingly contributing to brewing up Vermont-made beverages.
aetb / iStock

You've heard of farm-to-table. But what about farm-to-pint-glass?

Vermont Edition looks at locally-grown hops and grains used in some Vermont-made beers and spirits, why local ingredients can inspire — or bedevil — small brewers or distillers, and how Vermont's climate and soil can give hops and other ingredients distinctive flavors you can taste right in the glass.

A worker installs fiber optic lines in Norton.
Toby Talbot / AP

Despite wide agreement that broadband internet access is crucial to the state's economic development, more than a quarter of Vermont residents are on the wrong side of that digital divide. We're talking about the scale of the challenge and what's being considered to deliver broadband to the state's rural areas, including a new bill that would help towns figure out how to make their own pushes for broadband projects. 

Emily Corwin / Vermont Public Radio

There aren’t nearly enough inpatient beds in Vermont for children in mental health crisis. Instead, kids who are a danger to themselves and others wait idly — for days — in emergency rooms.

Last year at UVM Medical Center in Burlington, 73 children spent an average three and a half days waiting for placement somewhere else. Many spent much longer. Parents, doctors, even hospital officials agree this is an urgent problem.

There is a child psychiatric facility with twelve beds — six newly reopened — just across Lake Champlain. The UVM Medical Center helps run the facility. The only problem: Vermont kids aren’t getting to use it.

Helen Lyons can be heard hosting mornings on "VPR Classical" weekdays between 7 a.m. and 10 a.m.
Matthew Smith / VPR

Morning listeners to VPR Classical likely noticed a new voice on the air over the last month.

Helen Lyons, a classically-trained soprano who’s performed in genres from opera to chamber music in the U.S., Europe and Asia, joined VPR in February as the new morning host.

Vermont Education Secretary Dan French, left, and State Board of Education chairwoman Krista Huling consult a merger map during a State Board meeting Wednesday.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR File

The Vermont Agency of Education is stepping up its pressure on school districts that are fighting their Act 46 forced mergers.

Secretary of Education Dan French sent out a memo Friday saying if districts don’t move forward with the forced mergers, the state "will take every action legally available to bring the district into compliance."

The Everything That follows: A Novel cover, by Meg Little Reilly. It shows the front of a boat during a rainstorm.
Courtesy, Meg Little Reilly / Publisher: MIRA Books

A woman named Kat hesitates when she's invited to take a boating trip on Martha's Vineyard, but she ultimately decides to go. Everything that follows turns her life into a nightmare — and Everything That Follows is also the title of this novel by Vermonter Meg Little Reilly.

Provided by the Department of Mental Health in response to a request for public records.

Over the last year, about a dozen involuntary psychiatric patients have filed legal arguments claiming it is unconstitutional to make them wait in hospital emergency rooms for a treatment bed.

When psychiatric patients are deemed a threat to themselves or others and then refuse treatment, the state can force them to receive treatment against their will. But a shortage of inpatient beds means many have to wait in the ER for days to receive care.

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