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Failure to recognize faces - even of those familiar to a person - is called prosopagnosia or face blindness and it affects about two percent of the population.
Missbobbit / iStock

Live call-in discussion: Most of us take for granted the ability to recognize the faces of our friends and loved ones. But for about two percent of individuals, it isn't that easy. They have a condition called prosopagnosia or face blindness. Brad Duchaine, Dartmouth College professor of psychological and brain sciences, joins us to discuss the latest research in this field.

"The Moth" offers storytellers the opportunity to sharpen their skills in front of a live audience. Marlon "Big Fish" Fisher is shown hosting a local Moth event.
Ty Robertson / VPR FILE

Everyone has interesting things happen to them - at least once in a while - but not everyone knows how to tell a good story about their experiences. Susanne Schmidt is someone who does. She's a storyteller and regional producer of The Moth, which puts on storytelling events across the country.

Hermitage Trio Live

21 hours ago
Lisa-Marie Mazzucco / www.hermitagepianotrio.com

The Hermitage Piano Trio from Russia visits VPR's Stetson Studio One for a live performance in advance of their Lane Series concert Friday evening.

Listen Friday March 22 at 11 a.m.

An artistically lit basketball.
GoodLifeStudio / iStock

The University of Vermont’s men’s basketball team is set to face Florida State University in the first round of the NCAA March Madness tournament. The Catamounts are set to tip off at 2 p.m. Thursday at the XL Center in Hartford, Connecticut. 

All Images Public Domain - Collage by James Stewart

We are continuing to celebrate the life and music of J.S. Bach and Chopin, listening to excerpts from a recent concert I hosted with pianist Paul Orgel in VPR’s Stetson Studio One while also featuring highlights from an interview I had with pianist and Chopin scholar Marjan Kiepura. You can listen to all of Paul Orgel’s performances from “The Alchemy of Genius” pairing Nocturnes by Chopin with excerpts from Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier Book II here.

"Vermont Edition" collects interviews from four graphic novelists, featuring work from (clockwise from top left) Jason Lutes, Alison Bechdel, Rachel Lindsay, and James Sturm.
DRAWN AND QUARTERLY / Meg Malone for VPR / RACHEL LINDSAY

A special Vermont Edition collects interviews with cartoonists and graphic novel creators, showcasing local work in the unique art form that presents novel-length stories in a comic strip format. It's a combination of words and images that doesn't shy away from difficult subjects: these Vermont cartoonists tackle mental health, crumbling marriages, world wars and the current political climate.

We're talking potholes.
Andy Arthur / flickr

A rough winter for roads throughout the state means potholes are plentiful and making for some bone-rattling car rides. Experts from the Agency of Transportation join Vermont Edition to talk about how potholes form, how they're fixed and how they can be prevented.

Tunbridge Planning Commission member Ingrid Van Steamburg sits before a table with different color nametags, to correspond with different towns.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

It's been almost a year since Utah developer David Hall announced that he would be giving up on his plan to build a 5,000-acre "sustainable community," designed for up to 20,000 people, in the Upper Valley.

Now people from the four towns that pushed back on the development are trying to figure out what's next, working together to come up with regional solutions to many of the same issues other rural communities around Vermont face.

Bhuwan Sharma sits at a desk at Burlington Employment Agency.
Bayla Metzger / VPR

The Burlington area is a hub for refugees and immigrants in Vermont, but area officials and businesses are concerned about this population shrinking. Recent federal restrictions have limited the number of refugees coming to the state and there's another problem too: some New Americans are choosing to leave Vermont.

A snow-covered Vermont Statehouse, with an American and Vermont flag flying in front.
Oliver Parini / For VPR

This past Town Meeting Day, voters in South Burlington backed a plan to tax rental cars. However in a case like this, where local residents vote to make a change to their town charter, it still needs to be approved by the Vermont Legislature before it can go into effect. So why is that? And might that process change? 

The Barge Canal on Pine Street in Burlington is one of 14 Superfund cleanup sites in Vermont.
Alden Pellett / Associated Press/File

They were everything from tanneries to landfills to copper mines. They are Vermont's 14 Superfund sites; locations that were so polluted they required a long-term cleanup plan of the hazardous material contaminations. We'll "visit" some of them at a time when the Environmental Protection Agency is doing five-year reviews of six of the sites.

Montpelier author Katherine Paterson is being recognized for her body of work in children's literature.
courtesy Katherine Paterson

Author Katherine Paterson, who lives in Montpelier, is being recognized for “an exceptional lifetime body of work" by the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Paterson is known for books for kids and young adults like Bridge to Terabithia, The Great Gilly Hopkins, Jacob Have I Loved, and many others. She took home this year’s E.B. White Award—a prize she says has personal significance.

Courtney Adams/UVM Athletics

One of those fates awaits the University of Vermont men’s basketball team Saturday when it hosts the University of Maryland Baltimore County in the championship game of the America East conference tournament. At stake is the league’s automatic bid to the NCAA tournament, a winner-takes-all showdown five months in the making.

A wildlife keeper at VINS shows a barred owl to visitors.
Paul Cooper / flickr

It’s been a rough winter for owls—and the Vermont Institute of Natural Science says it’s mostly affecting young owls experiencing their first winter.

Right As Rain book cover, features two kids sitting next to each other
HarperCollins

Lindsey Stoddard has something in common with Rain, the narrator of her new young adult novel Right As Rain. Like the young girl whose life is uprooted when she abruptly moves from Vermont to New York City's Spanish Harlem neighborhood, Stoddard has experienced a similar locale change as well.

Sen. Patrick Leahy, flanked by Sen. Jon Tester of Montana, left, and Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York, speaks at a February 2019 news conference amid border security negotiations.
Andrew Harnik / AP

Thursday in Washington, Sen. Patrick Leahy voted to block President Donald Trump's emergency declaration on the southern border. We're talking with the Senator about that resolution, security and humanitarian concerns at the Southern border, Sen. Bernie Sanders' 2020 presidential run and more.

A blue sky day and a wide shot of a snowy, frozen lake, with people walking on it in the background.
Henry Epp / VPR

Last week, the National Weather Service in Burlington made it official: Lake Champlain has fully frozen over for the first time since February 2015. However with Thursday temperatures forecast to reach the 50s, the full freeze might not last much longer.

Two women hug among a crowd in a hallway
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Springfield Hospital needs to trim about $6.5 million from the current year budget, and the administration announced recently that the childbirth center may be closed to save money.

President Donald Trump at a podium outside the White House.
Susan Walsh / Associated Press

Vermont is joining more than a dozen states suing the Trump administration over its declaration of a national emergency, which is intended to fund construction of a wall along the U.S.-Mexican border.

Rodney Chayer, of Duxbury, at a public hearing regarding gun legislation at Vermont Technical College in Randolph, Vt.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

About 200 gun rights advocates traveled to Randolph Tuesday evening to weigh in on proposed gun legislation that they say violates their right to bear arms.

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