Amy Kolb Noyes

Reporter

Amy is an award winning journalist who has worked in print and radio in Vermont since 1991. Her first job in professional radio was at WVMX in Stowe, where she worked as News Director and co-host of The Morning Show. She has been a VPR contributor since 2006, covering Lamoille County and the Northeast Kingdom. Amy has a B.S. in Broadcast Journalism from Syracuse University.

Amy is creator and curator of Dorothy’s List, VPR’s book club for kids based on the books nominated for Vermont’s Dorothy Canfield Fisher Award. For the show/podcast, every year she reads all 30 books nominated for the award. When she’s not reading middle grade books, talking to northern Vermonters or taking pictures, you can often find her in goal at the local ice rink or cheering on her favorite Boston sports teams. Go Sox!

Ways to Connect

Potential partners look at plans for a new venue in Burlington.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Burton – a worldwide pioneer in snowboarding – is joining forces with other well-known Vermont businesses, in hopes of bringing something new to its own neighborhood in Burlington’s South End. If the city approves, the Burton campus will be the new home of Higher Ground and other attractions.

The exterior of the closed St. John the Apostle Church, in Johnson, Vt.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR File

A former Catholic church in Johnson has been sold to a new nonprofit aiming to fight opioid addiction.

St. Albans City Manager Dominic Cloud
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Leaders in St. Albans have been sparring with Vermont's state auditor about the city's implementation of a downtown revitalization program. Doug Hoffer says the city isn't playing by the rules, while local officials say Hoffer is trying to change the rules partway through the game.

A student sits at a table in a library holding up a copy of the novel Refugee by Alan Gratz.
Meg Malone / VPR

Each spring, upper elementary students schools in the Mt. Abraham Unified School District travel to the middle and high school library for a Jeopardy!-style trivia competition about the books nominated for Vermont's Dorothy Canfield Fisher Award.

But before the gathered students from the five different elementary schools got to play the game, there was an announcement to be made: the 2019 winner. 

Citizen scientists monitor a vernal pool in Montpelier.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

There’s been some unusual outdoor activity around Vermont this spring. In Chittenden County, people have been placing bowls of soapy water in fields, trying to catch bees. Elsewhere, people armed with clipboards have been counting amphibian egg masses and insect larvae in vernal pools.

Wood stoves for sale at Chimney Sweep II, in Berlin.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Two years ago, the state offered Vermonters money to buy a new wood or pellet stove if they got rid of an old, polluting stove. The program was so popular, they decided to do it again this year (with a few changes). So how many people have taken advantage of these different iterations of the wood stove change-out program? 

'Downstream: The Effects of Parental Incarceration' is a film that tells the struggles of Vermont families when a parent goes to jail.
Lamoille Restorative Center, Courtesy

A film about the effects of parental incarceration is making its way around the state. The movie, a project of the Lamoille Restorative Center, features young Vermonters growing up with a parent in jail.

A row of books and a DCF sign hanging below it.
Meg Malone / VPR

The Vermont Department of Libraries will be changing the name of the Dorothy Canfield Fisher Children's Book Award.

A teacher holds an open book and points at it while students look on.
Meg Malone / VPR

A group of fifth- and sixth-graders are in the library of Orleans Elementary School working on making “'zines.” 'Zines are like personal mini magazines, and they're a favorite hobby of Malú, the main character in The First Rule of Punk by Celia C. Pérez.

Lamoille County Sheriff Roger Marcoux stands before stacks of cardboard boxes
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Saturday is the semiannual National Prescription Drug Take Back Day, when people are encouraged to bring their unwanted medications to "take back" locations set up by local law enforcement agencies.

The exterior of the current Albany General Store with a snowpile in front.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

The general store is the heart of many small Vermont towns, but the rise of online shopping and big box stores has made it hard for some more traditional stores to stay open.

Some Vermont towns are turning to public-private partnerships to keep their general stores viable. In one Northeast Kingdom town they’re counting on that model to get their store back.

A replica Statue of Liberty, painted by art students at Lake Region Union High School, stands on the ice of Lake Parker, in West Glover. The hill in the background is where locals surmise the statue might have gone, had it been erected in Glover.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

There’s a wooden replica of the Statue of Liberty, complete with a light-up torch, standing on the ice of Lake Parker, in the Northeast Kingdom village of West Glover. It’s there to publicize a new ice out contest to benefit the Glover Ambulance Squad, but it’s a story that goes back 135 years.

Troy and Jon Osborne stand before their sugarhouse in Ferdinand. Troy is holding Jon's dog, Bodie.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Some maple sugarmakers say sap runs through their veins. It may be just an expression, but sugaring does seem to be in the blood of the Osborne brothers. They're still working the family's Ferdinand woods that took the lives of two Osborne patriarchs.

Greg Tatro holds a picture of his daughter, Jenna, who died of an opioid overdose in February. In the foreground are piles of sympathy cards he and his wife have received.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

For six years, Greg and Dawn Tatro watched their daughter struggle with an opioid addiction. Then in February, Jenna Tatro died at age 26 in their home in Johnson. Now her parents hope to create a community-based recovery center to help others fight addiction.

A group of students at Champlain Elementary School's library - some standing, some sitting, some kneeling - looking toward the camera.
Meg Malone / VPR

Beyond the Bright Sea takes place in 1925 on a string of small islands called the Elizabeths, off the coast of Woods Hole, Massachusetts. The novel is a work of historical fiction, but it was mystery and suspense that grabbed — and held — the attention of a group of Dorothy's List readers at Burlington's Champlain Elementary School.

People line up in Wolcott on Town Meeting Day.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Sometimes, especially in small towns where people have lived alongside each other for decades, elections can get personal. Such was the case in Wolcott on Town Meeting Day 2019, when two women who have been running the town together for nearly three decades went head-to-head for the top job.

Elmore Fire Chief Brent Hosking stands beside his department's 40-year-old second engine.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

While school budgets and selectboard elections get the headlines, veteran town meeting goers know the gatherings usually aren't complete without debate about new equipment for the town highway or fire departments. In Elmore, a debate about a new fire truck has divided the community before the meeting even begins.

A group of fifth- and sixth-grade students, some standing some sitting on a couch, and looking at the camera
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Mars is a very different place from Earth. But for Liam and his friend Phoebe, the main characters in the science fiction novel Last Day on Mars, the Earth colony on Mars is the only home they have ever known.

A honeybee sits in the center of a purple flower.
DanielPrudek / iStock

Pollinators are creating a buzz in Cabot in the lead up to Town Meeting Day. This year, Cabot voters will consider officially becoming a "Pollinator Friendly Community."

A Morristown banner hangs outside the Morrisville Food Co-Op; the banner bears the town's name, the co-op the name of the village.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

There’s a nonbinding question on the town meeting ballot in Morristown that’s revealing something of an identity crisis in town.

Pages