Angela Evancie

Managing Editor for Podcasts

Angela Evancie is VPR's managing editor for podcasts and the host of VPR's people-powered journalism podcast, Brave Little State.

Angela joined VPR's news team in 2013 as as a digital producer; she became the station's first digital editor for news in 2015. Her work on the team helped earn VPR numerous national awards, including a 2016 national Edward R. Murrow Excellence in Video award for a Lego explanation of how the Iowa caucus works, a 2015 Associated Press Media Editors (APME) Community Engagement award for VPR's Traces Project and a 2014 Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) award for VPR's multimedia campaign coverage. In 2015, her story about the difficulty of determining what's local at Trader Joe's was awarded a regional Edward R. Murrow award in the writing category.

In 2016, Angela and former VPR All Things Considered host Alex Keefe launched Brave Little State, a podcast about curiosity and Vermont that aims to make journalism more inclusive, more transparent and more fun. The fifth episode of the show, about Vermont's Abenaki Native Americans, earned a national Edward R. Murrow award for news documentary. 

Angela has contributed work to NPR, This American Life and The Atlantic, among other outlets. She launched her journalism career with a 2010 Compton Mentor Fellowship and a 2011 Middlebury Fellowship in Environmental Journalism. 

Angela attended Middlebury College and holds a master of arts degree from the Middlebury Bread Loaf School of English. A native of Addison County, she now lives in the Upper Valley.

Ways to Connect

And illustration of a neighborhood.
filo / iStockphoto.com

What are the causes of Vermont’s tight housing market — and why aren’t things getting better?

My Heart Still Beats logo. Text says VPR My Heart Still Beats, a project of Writers for Recovery and has illustrations of six people.
Janelle Sing

A six-part series from Writers for Recovery and Vermont Public Radio, featuring voices from Vermont's recovery community. Coming February 25. 

Congressman Peter Welch poses for a portrait outside his office at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington, D.C.
Eman Mohammed for VPR

Sure, you might occasionally see Vermont's U.S. House representative when he's back in the Green Mountains — but what does Peter Welch's life on Capitol Hill look like?

Congressman Peter Welch makes a phone call from his office at Capitol Hill building in Washington, D.C.
Eman Mohammed for VPR

Normally our show answers your questions about Vermont, our region and its people. This month, we decided to do something a little different.

Firewood stacked in a shed.
Emily Corwin / VPR

“What are the environmental and economic benefits of wood heat in Vermont? And then what are the costs to that?” That question comes to Brave Little State from Coco Moseley of Lincoln, who – like many Vermonters – heats her family’s home with an antique wood stove.

Emmet Moseley loads a log into his wood stove.
Emily Corwin / VPR

In the winter, Coco and Emmet Moseley keep their farmhouse cozy and warm with an antique wood stove — and Coco is wondering about the benefits and drawbacks of their heat source.

Rep. Peter Welch and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi at Welch's ceremonial swearing in on Capitol Hill on Thursday, Jan. 3, 2019. The two Congress members stand in front of American flags.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

As the balance of power shifts in Washington, Brave Little State collected your questions for Vermont Rep. Peter Welch to shape our upcoming episode.

Rep. Peter Welch stands at a podium with a Democratic Party banner behind him.
Angela Evancie / VPR

When Congress reconvenes next month, Rep. Peter Welch will be part of the Democratic majority in the U.S. House — the party's first majority since 2011. What role will he play in the new balance of power?

“What does it take to start and run a successful small business in Vermont?” That’s the question that VPR podcast Brave Little State answers in its December 2018 episode.

Host Angela Evancie talks to VPR's Mitch Wertlieb about how the people-powered podcast model works, plus we play an excerpt from the episode to learn about what sparked the curiosity for this month's question-asker and hear advice from small-business owners in Vermont.

Antoinette and Clint Hunt, co-founders of Abracadabra Coffee Co. in Woodstock, stand in front of their coffee roaster.
Angela Evancie / VPR

What do you do when you want to start something new, but you don’t know exactly how?

“Why Are There So Many African-Americans Incarcerated In Vermont?” That’s the question VPR podcast Brave Little State answers in its November 2018 episode. Host Angela Evancie talks about how the people-powered podcast model works; who asked this month’s question; and how she and reporter John Dillon began to unravel the answer.

Mirror Images / istockphoto.com

Overall, Vermont has one of the lowest incarceration rates in the country — but one of the highest rates of African-American incarceration. So why is that?

“What’s it like to hike the Long Trail?” That’s the question that VPR podcast Brave Little State answers in its October 2018 episode. Host Angela Evancie talks about how the people-powered podcast model works, where this month’s question came from, and shares a bit about the trail.

Angela Evancie / VPR

The 272-mile Long Trail follows Green Mountain ridgelines from one end of Vermont to another. So what’s it like to hike the whole thing?

Logo for JOLTED, a five-part podcast about a school shooting that didn't happen, the line between thought and crime, and a Republican governor in a rural state who changed his mind about gun laws.
Aaron Shrewsbury for VPR

This month on Brave Little State, we interrupt our regular question-asking to bring you the first installment of JOLTED, a new five-part podcast from the VPR newsroom.

Angela Evancie / VPR

Want to have a say in the question that Brave Little State explores for our October episode? Now's your chance to vote!

Angela Evancie / VPR

You know the feeling. You’re driving along, somewhere in Vermont, and you turn onto a road with an intriguing name. And you wonder where it came from.

Angela Evancie / VPR

This month’s question led Brave Little State straight into an unfolding story — about an outsider with deep pockets and big ideas, and the towns that banded together to reject those ideas. 

David Hall.
Steve Zind / VPR file

A developer from Utah has abandoned his plans to build a futuristic utopia in the hills of central Vermont.

Angela Evancie / VPR

“Where are all the aging hippies that moved to Vermont during the '60s and '70s, and what are they doing now?”

Pages