Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound. In 2016 she started the nationally recognized But Why, which takes questions from kids all over the world and finds interesting people to answer them.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service. Her hobbies include photography, nature writing and wandering the woods and fields of New England. She lives in Monkton.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller walks past the White House on Sunday, March 24, 2019, just days after delivering his findings in the Russia investigation and the Trump presidential campaign.
Cliff Owen / AP

The findings from Special Counsel Robert Mueller mean talk of impeaching President Trump are likely over, according to Garrett Graff, a Vermont-based reporter who’s followed Mueller's career for years. 

We're talking about the debate over life without parole in Vermont.
powerofforever / iStock

Life in prison with no chance of parole is the harshest punishment possible in Vermont. Some see it as a necessary sentence for the worst crimes, whiles others see it as an unforgiving punishment devoid of hope for rehabilitation. We're talking about what life without parole means for public safety, rehabilitation and deterrence, and for the cost of the justice system in Vermont.

Warmer winters mean ticks are taking a toll on the moose population. We're featuring some of our recent coverage of the local impacts on climate change.
Elliot Black / flickr

Vermont Edition is featuring some of our recent coverage of climate change on our region - including significant changes for weather, wildlife and agriculture. Plus: discussion of what we can do on local and global levels to combat climate change and effectively deal with its effects.

Forest therapy guide Duncan Murdoch takes in his surroundings in Arms Forest in Burlington.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

Forest bathing is an English interpretation of the Japanese term shinrin-yoku and it is the idea that spending time in nature in an alert but relaxed manner has healing and rejuvenating benefits. But why, in a state where many Vermonters already feel connected to the natural landscape around them, would someone pay to go on a forest bathing excursion with a forest therapy guide? Vermont Edition went to find out.

Failure to recognize faces - even of those familiar to a person - is called prosopagnosia or face blindness and it affects about two percent of the population.
Missbobbit / iStock

Most of us take for granted the ability to recognize the faces of our friends and loved ones. But for about two percent of individuals, it isn't that easy. They have a condition called prosopagnosia or face blindness. Brad Duchaine, Dartmouth College professor of psychological and brain sciences, joins us to discuss the latest research in this field.

"The Moth" offers storytellers the opportunity to sharpen their skills in front of a live audience. Marlon "Big Fish" Fisher is shown hosting a local Moth event.
Ty Robertson / VPR FILE

Everyone has interesting things happen to them - at least once in a while - but not everyone knows how to tell a good story about their experiences. Susanne Schmidt is someone who does. She's a storyteller and regional producer of The Moth, which puts on storytelling events across the country.

"Vermont Edition" collects interviews from four graphic novelists, featuring work from (clockwise from top left) Jason Lutes, Alison Bechdel, Rachel Lindsay, and James Sturm.
DRAWN AND QUARTERLY / Meg Malone for VPR / RACHEL LINDSAY

A special Vermont Edition collects interviews with cartoonists and graphic novel creators, showcasing local work in the unique art form that presents novel-length stories in a comic strip format. It's a combination of words and images that doesn't shy away from difficult subjects: these Vermont cartoonists tackle mental health, crumbling marriages, world wars and the current political climate.

We're talking potholes.
Andy Arthur / flickr

A rough winter for roads throughout the state means potholes are plentiful and making for some bone-rattling car rides. Experts from the Agency of Transportation join Vermont Edition to talk about how potholes form, how they're fixed and how they can be prevented.

Melody A / istock

Why do we laugh? Why do you feel ticklish when someone tickles you? Why can't you tickle yourself? In this episode, originally from 2018, we learn about how humor develops with Gina Mireault of the Infant Laughter Project at Northern Vermont University. Plus: April Fools traditions and we listen to jokes sent in by kids with Vermont comedian Josie Leavitt.

Montpelier author Katherine Paterson is being recognized for her body of work in children's literature.
courtesy Katherine Paterson

Author Katherine Paterson, who lives in Montpelier, is being recognized for “an exceptional lifetime body of work" by the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Paterson is known for books for kids and young adults like Bridge to Terabithia, The Great Gilly Hopkins, Jacob Have I Loved, and many others. She took home this year’s E.B. White Award—a prize she says has personal significance.

A wildlife keeper at VINS shows a barred owl to visitors.
Paul Cooper / flickr

It’s been a rough winter for owls—and the Vermont Institute of Natural Science says it’s mostly affecting young owls experiencing their first winter.

Psychiatric patients in crisis can wait days in emergency departments due to a lack on inpatient beds.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

VPR's investigative reporter Emily Corwin has been looking into the care received by young psychiatric patients in crisis. As with adults, children and adolescents can spend days in hospital emergency departments. And some parents and doctors have complained about the quality and amount of care they receive from psychiatrists while in the ER.

Artists Sean (left) Clute and Otto Muller (center) stand among hanging dried stalks of Japanese knotweed with Julian Scott Memorial Gallery director Phillip Robertson.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

A new art exhibit at Northern Vermont University's Johnson campus uses the invasive plant Japanese knotweed to explore concepts of invasiveness and colonization in a multimedia interactive experience.

A scanning electron microscope image of an HIV virus.
Wikimedia Commons

In Vermont, almost 700 people have received care for HIV in the last few years. Vermont Edition spoke to Roy Belcher - an epidemiologist and HIV surveillance coordinator for the state - about what life looks like for Vermonters living with the virus, what has changed and what treatments are available.

On "Vermont Edition" we're talking about growing grains and hops, malting barley locally and how nearby farmers are increasingly contributing to brewing up Vermont-made beverages.
aetb / iStock

You've heard of farm-to-table. But what about farm-to-pint-glass?

Vermont Edition looks at locally-grown hops and grains used in some Vermont-made beers and spirits, why local ingredients can inspire — or bedevil — small brewers or distillers, and how Vermont's climate and soil can give hops and other ingredients distinctive flavors you can taste right in the glass.

A worker installs fiber optic lines in Norton.
Toby Talbot / AP

Despite wide agreement that broadband internet access is crucial to the state's economic development, more than a quarter of Vermont residents are on the wrong side of that digital divide. We're talking about the scale of the challenge and what's being considered to deliver broadband to the state's rural areas, including a new bill that would help towns figure out how to make their own pushes for broadband projects. 

Helen Lyons can be heard hosting mornings on "VPR Classical" weekdays between 7 a.m. and 10 a.m.
Matthew Smith / VPR

Morning listeners to VPR Classical likely noticed a new voice on the air over the last month.

Helen Lyons, a classically-trained soprano who’s performed in genres from opera to chamber music in the U.S., Europe and Asia, joined VPR in February as the new morning host.

Darcee Alderman, co-owner of the Monkton General Store, stands next to her chocolate tempering machine. She says selling store-made chocolate is one way she tries to carve a niche for her store.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

Update 1:10 p.m. — As of midday Saturday, the store had surpassed its $20,000 goal. See more at bottom of post.

Original post:

The Monkton General Store was buzzing on Thursday afternoon, with customers grabbing scones, store-made chocolate, beer and pizza.

Carrie French, who lives just down the road, had her arms full of an odd assortment of goods.

Vermonters receive an estimated 145,000 robocalls every day. We're looking at what's behind the rapidly increasing numbers of robocalls.
Kirillm / iStock

Vermonters gets an estimated 4.5 million robocalls each month. Calls from scammers and marketers to an 802 number have doubled in just the last two years. We're looking at what's behind the rise in robocalls and ways you can protect yourself from the flood of unwanted calls.

Stacks of diapers in a row.
Vrabelpeter1 / iStock

Food shelves rarely stock diapers, and families can't use federal subsidies like WIC or SNAP to buy them. To address this need, a new diaper bank is opening to serve communities in Chittenden County.

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