Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound. In 2016 she started the nationally recognized But Why, which takes questions from kids all over the world and finds interesting people to answer them.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service. Her hobbies include photography, nature writing and wandering the woods and fields of New England. She lives in Monkton.

The long and winding road for Act 46 is nearing its final deadline. But questions and court decisions are still in play that could change the final outcomes.
ErikaMitchell / iStock

Four years after it was signed, the Act 46 school district consolidation law is nearing its final deadline on July 1. But there are court cases, refusals by school districts to merge and many questions swirling around the remaining mergers. We get updates and answers on these issues.

A child looks on as a duo play the 1988 "Operation Thunderbolt" arcade game during the April 7, 2019 opening of the "Dream Machine II Arcade Exhibit" in Rutland.
Nick Grandchamp, courtesy

You're just as likely to run into a game of Pac-Man or Street Fighter II today in the basement of a diehard collector of retro 1980s arcade games as you are to play one in the corner of a pizza parlor or bowling alley. But one Rutland collector is putting more than a dozen of the machines together in a pop-up exhibit showcasing the games, their history and the value of playing together.

We're talking about the science of fentanyl and its effects on the body.
Rick Bowmer / AP

The synthetic opioid fentanyl is causing deadly overdoses to spike across the country. But while concerns have been raised about accidental exposure, it is incredibly unlikely that chance contact with the substance through skin or inhalation can be toxic. We're talking about the science behind fentanyl and how it acts on the body, plus which dangers are real and which are overblown.

At the New York State Capitol in Albany, legislators have been debating the budget, a plastic bag ban and funding for clean water projects.
Izumi Jones / Unsplash

The New York state legislature is dealing with many of the same issues as lawmakers in Vermont; in Albany there's been debate as lawmakers work on putting together a plastic bag ban and coming up with the right source for clean water funding. And then there's the budget that just passed and awaits a signature from the governor.

Blue-green algae blooms in the summer of 2014 in Lake Champlain.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR FILE

Vermont lawmakers agree the state needs millions of dollars' worth of clean water projects. But there's less agreement on where Vermont will get the roughly $60 million it needs to fund them. We're talking about clean water plans advancing in Montpelier and what the options are to pay for them.

istock
Keith Szafranski

Good Question! In this episode of But Why, we answer some questions that make us say, huh? Why do shoes get stinky? Why are little brothers so annoying? Also, why don't tow trucks have sirens?

Personal stylist Stasia Savasuk believes there must be congruency between who you are inside and what you project through what you wear.
Gorodenkoff / iStock

Do the clothes you wear really reflect the person you are? Are your sartorial choices dictated by your job or other outside factors? Stasia Savasuk is a personal stylist and founder of Stasia’s Style School and she joins Vermont Edition to discuss the role your clothes play in who you are.

A prototype of the SheFly hiking pants shows the zipper that extends nearly to the back of the pants.
SheFly, courtesy

You’re out in the country when nature calls. For some people, dealing with that bodily function can be as simple as unzipping a fly. But for others, it’s a lot more complicated. Enter SheFly Apparel — a new company started by a trio of Middlebury College students that is bringing some much-needed enhancements to women’s hiking attire. 

A maintenance crew walks towards Vermont Air National Guard F-16 fighter jets in South Burlington in April 2010. The final four F-16s departed Vermont on Saturday, April 6, making room for a fleet of 18 F-35 jets set to arrive this fall.
Toby Talbot / AP

After more than 30 years, the last F-16 fighter jets flew out of Vermont Saturday, April 6. Now the Vermont Air National Guard is preparing pilots, mechanics and more for the arrival of a new fleet of F-35 jets this fall. We're looking back at the F-16s' years of service in Vermont and getting an update on the controversy and costs surrounding the coming F-35s.

A July 23, 2018 file photo from Greenfield, Mass.
Elise Amendola / Associated Press

A bill under consideration by the Vermont Legislature would decriminalize the possession of unprescribed buprenorphine, a drug used to treat opioid use disorder. Proponents say the bill would save lives; critics say it would send a dangerous message.

Chef Cara Chigazola Tobin looks over the bulk spices in the pantry at Honey Road.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

The James Beard Awards are known as the "Oscars of food," and this year Cara Chigazola Tobin was named a semifinalist, for the second year in a row, for Best Chef Northeast. She's the chef and co-owner of Honey Road, a restaurant in Burlington that's been serving eastern Mediterranean food for two years.

It can be tough to get a seat at the bustling restaurant, so Vermont Edition visited Honey Road before the dinner rush to talk to Chigazola Tobin about the ingredients she uses and her approach to running her own restaurant.

What does your life in Vermont look like in the year 2050? We're imagining Vermont at the mid-century and asking you to share what has - and hasn't - changed.
hanibaram / iStock

We're jumping ahead to the year 2050 to imagine what life will be like in Vermont by mid-century, and looking back from an imagined future to talk about how Vermont can address climate change and other challenges. 

David McMillan, Fred Morin and Meredith Erickson are authors of 'Joe Beef: Surviving the Apocalypse: Another Cookbook of Sorts.'
Jonathan Castellino

The iconic Montreal restaurant Joe Beef is known for excess. Now, the two chef-owners of the restaurant have embraced sobriety, and have written a new cookbook that's about food and the apocalypse. We're talking to them about working in the restaurant biz without drinking, and cooking for the end of the world.

Some 3 billion American chestnut trees succumbed to a fungal blight in the early 1900s. Now an organization dedicated to restoring the tree is seeking approval to release a genetically engineered chestnut tree into the wild.
Public Domain via Pixabay

The once-ubiquitous American chestnut tree is now functionally extinct, nearly erased from the landscape by a blight that killed roughly 3 billion trees over 50 years. Now a nonprofit organization dedicated to restoring the tree is seeking federal approval to release a genetically engineered blight-resistant chestnut into the wild. But is a genetically engineered tree the right way to restore a virtually extinct species?

From tobacco to opioid use, a just-launched study will get a timely snapshot of what substances Vermont's youths and young adults are using.
Master1305 / iStock

Getting an accurate snapshot of what "drugs of choice" young people are using can be extremely difficult. We'll hear about a study just launched in Vermont that aims to provide that information more quickly than in the past.

The month-long "University of Irasburg" is drawing from the town for both teachers and students for classes ranging from conversational Spanish to ways to cook a bear.
Judith Jackson, courtesy

They are a popular trend mixing the important with the ephemeral; "pop-up" shops offer a brief chance to buy boutique wares, while "pop-up" restaurants may only serve meals for a single day. Now in April the Northeast Kingdom town of Irasburg is recruiting students — and teachers — for the month-long "pop-up" University of Irasburg

A white-tailed deer photographed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. We're looking at the proposed changes to deer hunting in Vermont by 2020.
Scott Bauer / USDA

Hunting rules usually change due to shifts in the animal population hunters are harvesting. But in 2020, Vermont’s deer hunting rules are changing for a different reason: a long decline in the number of hunters. That's leading the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department to propose changes from bag limits to antler point restrictions to season structure. We're looking at the proposed changes.

April 15, tax day in the U.S., is fast approaching. We're talking about what's changed at the federal and state level that will impact how you file.
BackyardProduction / istock

Tax day — Monday, April 15 — is approaching fast. And this year, many people's returns may look significantly different than in years past, due to the law that overhauled the country's tax code starting in 2018. We're taking your questions and talking about what you need to know, including new tax rates and some big changes in standard and itemized deductions.

The U.S. Capitol, where laws are made.
Tanarch / istock

Who makes the laws? That's what 5-year-old Paxton from Kelowna, British Columbia wants to know! We learn about laws with Mike Doyle of the Canadian organization Civix,  and Syl Sobel, author of How the U.S. Government Works.  Plus: how do elections work? And why does the UK have a government and a queen?

In September 2018, former Gov. Madeleine Kunin joined "Vermont Edition" and a live audience to discuss her new book, "Coming of Age: My Journey to the Eighties."
Anna Ste Marie / VPR

During VPR's March Membership Drive Vermont Edition is featuring special episodes showcasing some of the best recent shows and collecting interviews with notable Vermonters. Few are more notable than the only woman to ever lead the state, former Gov. Madeleine Kunin.

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