Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound. In 2016 she started the nationally recognized But Why, which takes questions from kids all over the world and finds interesting people to answer them.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service. Her hobbies include photography, nature writing and wandering the woods and fields of New England. She lives in Monkton.

Amy Mulherin, a teacher in the Winston Prouty toddler program in Brattleboro, gets two of her students dressed to go outside and play in the snow.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

High-quality child care in Vermont can be tough to find and tougher to afford. And elected officials from the governor on down seem to agree that this is a serious problem for the state. So what's being done to address the issue? We're looking at the state of child care in Vermont. And going through some of the ideas on the table to make that care more accessible and affordable.

Cows and other animals or all sorts, and impressive farm equipment, are on display at the annual Vermont Farm Show.
Patti Daniels / VPR FILE

Since 1931—with a couple of exceptions—farmers have been getting together at this time of year for the Vermont Farm Show to socialize with other farmers and learn what's new in the agriculture world.

We'll be surrounded by hay bales and hay balers, horses and horse power when Vermont Edition broadcasts live from the annual Vermont Farm Show at the Champlain Valley Expo.

"Meal kits" aim to make cooking meals at home easier and less time-consuming. We're looking at the promise and reality of meal kits and Vermont-grown alternatives.
Unsplash

"Meal kit" services are an increasingly popular way to put dinner on the table, delivering everything you need to prepare a meal in a single box of ready-to-cook ingredients.

But what about finding time to cook and confidence in the kitchen? Do meal kits really save time, and do they help you eat fresh and local? We're talking about meal kits and Vermont's home-grown alternatives.

The Eye on the Sky team includes (from left) Steve Maleski, Mark Breen and Lawrence Hayes.
Courtesy Fairbanks Museum

It's hard to believe, but listeners have been transfixed by the Eye on the Sky weather forecasts on VPR for more than 37 years. It was December 1981 when the partnership between the station and the Fairbanks Museum and Planetarium began. Senior Meteorologist Mark Breen shares a behind-the-scenes look at the Eye on the Sky operation.

Volunteers help block, split and stack firewood as part of the wood bank firewood program at the United Way of Lamoille County.
United Way of Lamoille County, courtesy

January's Brave Little State looks at the pros and cons of heating with wood. About 38 percent of Vermont homes burn wood for some kind of heat. Almost a fifth of all households rely on wood as their primary way of staying warm.

But when Vermonters who heat with wood face the choice of heating their home or putting food on the table, it often falls to donation-based and volunteer-staffed wood banks to offer enough wood to help out.

Paid family leave programs provide a percentage of salary and job protection for those taking time off to care for a newborn, a family member or loved one.
mikyso / iStock

Last year Governor Phil Scott vetoed a paid family leave bill. This year, Scott and New Hampshire Governor Chris Sununu have unveiled a voluntary plan that would involve state employees from both states. The Legislature has also made the issue a priority for this term.

5G networks would require new antennas on existing telecommunication towers.
Emanuele D'Amico / iStock

The promises of 5G - the fifth-generation cellular technology - are incredibly fast speeds and the ability to connect thousands of devices at once. But according to the state's chief of telecommunications Vermonters hoping the technology will bring much-delayed broadband and cellular coverage to rural areas of the state will be disappointed.

Drag queens Nikki Champagne, left, Shani (center), and drag king Trey Goodlay are among a new generation of drag performers playing with gender in novel ways.
James Buck / Kristen Scott / Inner Beauty Photography

Vermont’s drag scene has been around for decades, but now a generation of drag queens and drag kings are breaking stereotypes and finding new ways to play with gender on stage. We're talking about how Vermont's drag scene is evolving with new kinds of drag performances.

 A plow driver uses a broom to clear off his truck in Burlington.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

Parts of Vermont saw as much as 18 inches of snow over the weekend. Big snow storms like this can pose a challenge for cities and towns with already strained budgets. We're talking about how municipalities work to keep roads safe and clear while facing challenges like high salt prices and aging equipment. 

We're talking about racism in Vermont with a panel sharing their thoughts and experiences.
FotografiaBasica / iStock

Former State Rep. Kiah Morris reported a long campaign of racist harassment directed at her and her family. It's put a spotlight on the issue of racism in Vermont. We're hearing from a panel of Vermonters to talk about their experiences and thoughts on racism in our state.

A sundial
ArisSu / iStock

How was time created? How did one minute become 60 seconds and one hour became 60 minutes? Why is time segmented into 12-hour periods? How do clocks work? Why is a year 365 days? Why is there an extra day in February every four years? Does time have a beginning or an end? Is time travel possible? Answers to all of your time questions with Andrew Novick of NIST, the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

The Spirit Sanctuary in Essex, New York hopes to preserve a wildlife corridor by turning it into a "green" burial ground.
The Spirit Sanctuary, courtest

To preserve a wildlife corridor between Lake Champlain and the Adirondacks that could help animals survive a changing climate, a new organization is taking a unique approach: the Spirit Sanctuary in Essex, New York is buying up land for people who want to be buried there.

The Monumental Arch in Palmyra, Syria in 2003, is one of the 100 photographs of pre-war Syria captured by Shaftsbury photographer Kevin Bubriski in "Legacy In Stone."
Kevin Bubriski

Syria—and its nearly decade-long civil war—has been the subject of countless news stories and foreign policy debates. Syrians fleeing violence from war and the Islamic State weigh heavily in the international conversation about refugees and migration.

In 2003, Shaftsbury photographer Kevin Bubriski started documenting what would become some of the final images of pre-war Syria. His stark black-and-white pictures of the architecture, places and people of Syria are collected in a new book called Legacy In Stone: Syria Before War.

Your car's "check engine" light can mean anything from mechanical issues to emissions concerns. We're looking at the end of the state's "conditional pass" and what it means for car inspections going forward.
baloon111 / iStock

This month the Vermont DMV sent out a postcard alerting motorists to the end of "conditional passes" for cars failing emissions tests during inspection, along with a list of ways to get a vehicle "ready" for inspection.

For many, the postcard led to confusion rather than clarity. We're looking at what's changed for Vermont's vehicle inspections and what you need to know about getting your car ready for inspection.

Attorney General TJ Donovan announced the results of the investigation into the alleged racial harassment of former state Rep.  Kiah Morris on Januart 14, 2019.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Vermont Attorney General TJ Donovan has released findings on the alleged racial harassment of former state Rep. Kiah Morris, saying that Morris was a victim of harassment but there is not enough evidence to prosecute. We're talking with the attorney general about the investigation, his office's new bias incident reporting system and his other priorities in the coming year.

Good News Garage reports that vehicle donations are down markedly from the previous year.
Artem Marchenko / Flickr

Without a statewide mass transit system, the need for an automobile is more acute in Vermont than in many other areas of the country. Especially in our most rural towns. And for many people, affording a reliable vehicle can be out of reach. Good News Garage, a nonprofit that refurbishes donated vehicles and gives them to Vermonters in need, is reporting lower vehicle donations this winter. But not a lower need for cars.

Looking into the empty interior of the Vermont Senate chamber. A chandelier hangs from the ceiling and green curtains adorn the windows.
Oliver Parini / For VPR, File

Paid family leave, a $15 per hour minimum wage and a tax-and-regulate marijuana system are expected to be some of the key issues decided on in this session of the Legislature. Vermont Edition speaks with Senate President Pro Tem Tim Ashe on the prospect of these and other issues.

Politico report on fresh allegations of sexual harassment within the the 2016 presidential campaign of Sen. Bernie Sanders.
Herb Swanson / VPR

The 2016 presidential campaign of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has faced accusations of "sexual violence and harassment" by staffers who worked on the campaign. Now new reporting from Politico identifies a senior campaign director who allegedly made inappropriate physical advances on a junior staffer in 2016.

The partial government shutdown has lasted since December 22. We're talking about the impact on Vermont.
Jose Luis Magana / AP

The partial shutdown of the federal government has now stretched to almost three weeks. We're looking at the impacts the shutdown is having on our state, from some federal employees going without pay to ripple effects on airports, farms and research. And we want to hear if you've been affected.

Photographer Matthew Thorsen's pictures have appeared in "Seven Days" for more than 20 years.
Diane Sullivan / courtesy Seven Days

For more than 20 years photographer Matthew Thorsen's pictures were a mainstay in Vermont’s weekly newspaper Seven Days, capturing the people, events and landscapes of the state and defining the paper’s visual style. He was well-known in Burlington's art and music scenes, as much for his quirky sense of style and shock of bleach blond hair as for his photographs.

Thorsen died on New Year's Day after a yearslong battle with cancer. He was 51. 

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