Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound. In 2016 she started the nationally recognized But Why, which takes questions from kids all over the world and finds interesting people to answer them.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service. Her hobbies include photography, nature writing and wandering the woods and fields of New England. She lives in Monkton.

A report warns that 40 percent of all insect species are facing extinction.
Andrew Moore / flickr

Scientists are warning of a staggering decline in insect population and diversity, with over 40 percent of all species at risk of extinction. That could have huge impacts on the wider ecosystem, and on human agriculture and the economy. We're talking about what — if anything — can be done, on large and small scales, to address the looming die-off.

As the Montreal Expos prepared for their first home game at Jarry Park on April 14, 1969, catcher John Bateman received the first pitch from Quebec Premier Jean-Jacques Bertrand.
Courtesy Archives de la Ville de Montreal / Flickr

The Montreal Expos started playing baseball at Jarry Park in 1969. They eventually moved to Olympic Stadium but it all came to an end after the 2004 season, when Major League Baseball moved the franchise to Washington, D.C.

Over the last several years, there has been a growing movement led by the Montreal Baseball Project to bring a team back to the city. Vermont Edition spoke with the group's president Warren Cromartie about the prospects of a team returning to Montreal.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, pictured here during the 2016 presidential election, announced Feb. 19 he'll again seek the Democratic nomination for president.
Rogelio V. Solis / AP

Sen. Bernie Sanders is officially in the race for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. We're talking with political scientists about Sanders' announcement, the crowded 2020 field and what it all means for Vermont.

The January 2017 women's march in Montpelier was followed by what organizers called a Unity Rally on the steps of the Statehouse. The march addressed issues like racism and civil rights.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

The Vermont Human Rights Commission is a state agency whose sole mission is to protect and preserve the human rights of Vermonters. The small agency—just three investigators, an executive director and an executive assistant—works on discrimination in housing, state government, employment and in public spaces like schools and restaurants. Now the Commission's new executive director is pledging to take a more proactive approach to fighting discrimination. 

Norwich University was founded in Norwich, Vermont. The school then spent a few years in Connecticut, but eventually settled for good in Northfield.
Courtesy Norwich University

Two hundred years ago, the American Literary, Scientific and Military Academy opened in Norwich, Vermont as the first all-private military college. Today, it's known as Norwich University and is located in Northfield. We'll learn about its storied history.

Vermont's suicide rate is among the highest in New England. The map above, using CDC data, shows Vermont's overall youth suicide rate between 2005 and 2016 was among the highest in the country.
CDC

Suicide is the eighth leading cause of death in Vermont, claiming more lives every year than car accidents in our state. And Vermont's young people die by suicide at one of the highest rates in the country. We're talking with doctors and researchers about effective suicide prevention. 

Greenpeace U.S. actions director, Katie Flynn-Jambeck, holds up plastic recovered from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.
Tabor Wordelman

Why is there a big patch of garbage in the Pacific Ocean? Four-year-old Leon has heard of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and he wants to know what the deal is. So we speak with someone who's actually been there! Teen Vogue News and Politics Editor Alli Maloney visited the garbage patch last year for a series called Plastic Planet. But in this episode we'll also explore how young people are becoming activists, trying to reduce the amount of plastic waste produced, waste that sometimes goes into the ocean. Anika Ballent, with the non-profit Algalita, shares what kids can and have been doing.

Anne Bemis of Burlington fondly remembers her 51 years of marriage to her late husband, Ed.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Nothing says Valentine's Day like a wonderful love story. And Vermont Edition got to hear one from Burlington's Anne Bemis about how she met her late husband, Ed. It was a chance meeting that resulted in 51 mostly happy years of marriage.

Former Vermont Secretary of Agriculture, Food and Markets Roger Albee chronicles the national and local history around the founding of two dairy co-ops back in 1919. The co-ops are now celebrating their 100th anniversary.
Ric Cengeri / VPR file

Statistics surrounding Vermont's dairy industry over the last decade have been bleak: falling milk prices have shuttered many small dairy farms, which have dwindled from 27,000 farms a century ago to about 700 dairies today.

But there is some celebrating going on in 2019, as both the Cabot Creamery Cooperative and the St. Albans Cooperative Creamery mark their 100th anniversaries. Which made us wonder, what was going on in Vermont dairy back in 1919?

Author and psychologist Polly Young-Eisendrath sees love as a spiritual path bewteen equals.
Grandfailure / iStock

Love can be a mystery. It can be confounding. But still we pursue it. With gusto. So on the holiday devoted to love, we'll talk with psychologist and author Polly Young-Eisendrath about modern love, understanding how to communicate with your partner and creating a relationship of equals.

James Sturm's new graphic novel is "Off Season."
courtesy Drawn & Quarterly

In his new graphic novel Off Season, cartoonist James Sturm charts the narrative of one couple trying to cope with the bewildering unraveling of their marriage and the political landscape of the 2016 presidential election.

Lawmakers are drafting rules to regulate the cultivation, manufacture and sale of cannabis. But what Vermont's rules will be and if there's support to make them law remains an open question.
Seastock / iStock

Last year Vermont legalized the possession and personal use of small amounts of marijuana. Now Vermont lawmakers are drafting rules for a legal and regulated system to buy, sell and grow cannabis. We're looking at what's being proposed for commercial cannabis in Vermont.

After the last Ice Age, the now-extinct heath hen were among the birds that populated Vermont.
American Museum of Natural History Library / Flickr

When we talk about birds on Vermont Edition, it's most often about what you're able to see outside right now. At your bird feeder, in your yard and in the forests. But birder and conservationist Maeve Kim took us on a trip back in time to "see" the ornithology of Vermont from the end of the last Ice Age forward.

We're talking about the closing of Green Mountain College in Poultney.
Nina Keck / VPR

After weeks of rumors flying among students and faculty, administrators announced that Green Mountain College in Poultney would close in May. Now, layoffs are already starting and the impact of the closure is being felt well beyond campus. We’re talking about the College's closing, the effects on the surrounding community and the next steps for all involved.

Sue-Ellen Booher of Warren helps patients at UVM Medical Center, then swims marathons in her free time.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Vermont Edition's ad-hoc series interviewing Interesting Vermonters has led us to a 106-year-old man from Townshend, the rose-sharing traditons of a Charlotte farmer and the maple syrup-swilling (unofficial) mayor of East Dover.

Now Warren's Sue-Ellen Booher is the latest Interesting Vermonter, a hematology nurse navigator at the Cancer Center at UVM Medical Center who's also a marathon swimmer.

Four bills being considered at the Statehouse have the reduction of plastic waste in their sights.
brunorbs / iStock

Four bills have been introduced in the Vermont Legislature that are trying to reduce the use and waste of plastics. These range from bills targeting plastic bottles, bags and straws, microplastics and buoys and docks. We'll discuss how to reduce plastic use and waste and the bills aimed at this goal.

Proposed legislation that would protect abortion rights in Vermont is leading to intense debate.
Matthew Smith / VPR

In response to potential threats to abortion rights at the national level, the Vermont House and Senate have both introduced legislation to explicitly protect women's access to abortion as a fundamental right. While the bills have strong support, they are also facing energetic opposition. We're talking through the debate.

Being a foster parent can present incredible challenges, but also unimagined rewards. We hear from Vermont foster parents and an adult who went through the foster care system.
fizkes / iStock

In 2018 more than 700 children needed to be placed in foster homes in Vermont by the Department for Children and Families. The department says it needs foster parents in all communities for children of all ages. We'll hear from foster parents who share why they made the decision to help children in need.

A lunch from Crossett Brook Middle School in Duxbury features whole-grain spaghetti with meat sauce, local apple, salad, broccoli, and a roll.
Vermont Agency of Education

Vermont schools offer free or reduced-cost meals to thousands of students every day. But how did schools become the venue to enact food policy? We're looking at school meal programs and the role they play in nutrition and education in school today.

The Beta Technologies prototype Ava XC lands during a test flight at the Plattsburgh International Airport.
Eric Adams / Beta Technologies

Electric transportation offers the promise of rapid travel and zero emissions, often seen in the increasingly sophisticated electric cars that can travel 200 to 300 miles on a single charge. But electric air travel poses unique challenges, not the least of which includes swapping a jet fuel-powered engine for a battery-powered aircraft.

Now the South Burlington- and Plattsburgh-based Beta Technologies is demoing an electric "air taxi" that the company says will be the electric aircraft at the center of planned cross-country flight this summer.

Pages