Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound. In 2016 she started the nationally recognized But Why, which takes questions from kids all over the world and finds interesting people to answer them.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service. Her hobbies include photography, nature writing and wandering the woods and fields of New England. She lives in Monkton.

Flickr/TarynMarie

The Department of Motor Vehicles has spent roughly $18 million on a new computer system thatdoesn't work. The courts have spent at least $1.7 million on their own computer system. It doesn't work either. Why have there been so many failures in the state's efforts to modernize its technology systems? We'll talk to John Dooley, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, and DMV Commissioner Robert Ide. We'll also talk to Commissioner of the Department of Information and the state's Chief Information Officer Richard Boes to find out what we can learn from these mistakes.

flickr/Sheep purple / Antibiotic resistance is a growing concern of health officials in the U.S.

Many patients have been prescribed penicillin, amoxicillin or Z-Pak and have been happy with the results. Antibiotics can be incredibly effective against bacterial infections. Until they're not. Those germs that the antibiotics are designed to kill can develop a way to outsmart the drugs.

Vermont State Epidemiologist for Infectious Disease Patsy Kelso and Dr. Kemper Alston, Professor of Medicine at UVM discuss the growing concern over antibiotic resistance, its consequences and what can be done to avoid it.

Courtesy of UVM Special Collections / Boys from Burlington’s Jewish neighborhood, 1920s.

In the 1880s, a group of families from Kovno, Lithuania, escaped persecution by emigrating to the United States. They settled in Burlington, surrounded by a landscape that reminded them of home.

They were the original families of Burlington's Jewish community, and for decades they preserved the Yiddish language and orthodox religious traditions in one compact Burlington neighborhood. That history will be presented in a documentary, Little Jerusalem, on Vermont Public Television.

kristin_a/Flickr

Children are often teased or bullied for behavior that doesn't fit within gender stereotypes-boys who like to dress up; girls who prefer GI Joes and trucks to Barbies. Some children realize early on that they don't fit within traditional gender norms. Transgender and gender variant youth have a hard time knowing where they belong. We'll talk with Melissa Murray, Executive Director of Outright Vermont, and Kim Jordan, a theater educator, about how children are taught about gender.

AP/Toby Talbot / UVM skier Kevin Drury competes in the giant slalom during the 2011 NCAA Championships in Stowe.

UVM's ski team is the defending national champion. Middlebury College will be hosting this season's championships. The Norwich University and Plattsburgh State women are dominating the Division 3 hockey ranks. While Dartmouth College has the country's highest athletic graduation rate.

We check in with local sports reporters and coaches to see what we can expect from area colleges and high schools during this winter's sports season.

Photo: vlauria/Flickr

More people are overweight and unhealthy in this country every year- and Vermont is no exception. Being overweight can contribute to health problems including diabetes. Yet people who are overweight often experience prejudice and stigma in this society.Our guests include Deputy Commissioner of Public Health Tracy Dolan; Naomi Fukagowa, professor at the UVM College of Medicine.

Toby Talbot / AP file

Kitchen Disasters

Nov 21, 2012
liquene/Flickr

The turkey is in the oven, you've just finished mashing the sweet potatoes, and the cranberries are simmering away on the stove. Any minute now your guests will start arriving, including your mother-in-law, and your daughter's new boyfriend. You've remembered to do everything, except turn on the oven.

Cooking can be a stressful experience for all of us, especially this time of year. Remember that time you put salt in the pie, instead of sugar? Share your stories of Thanksgiving kitchen disasters.

AP/Larry Crowe

The frenzied preparations that mark Thanksgiving can serve to distance us from the very food we're celebrating. So Tuesday on Vermont Edition, we talk with two people who have thought extensively about the meaning of food and what it reveals about our cultural priorities and values. Our guests are Tovar Cerulli, a vegan-turned-hunter and author of The Mindful Carnivore; and Ben Hewitt, author of The Town That Food Saved, which explores agricultural enterprise in Hardwick.

Photo: NcReedplayer, Flickr

One out of every seven people across America receives food stamps. And that number is rising every month. In Vermont, over 37,000 households receive food assistance money, although nearly a third of the people who qualify for the program do not sign up.

Have food stamps or food shelves helped your family get by in tough times? Today we'll hear YOUR stories about the challenges of going hungry in Vermont. Do you make choices between paying for heating or for food? Tell your story, below.

Long dark evenings are turning chilly, and we are tucking into piles of great new books coming out during this, the fall publishing season. Tell us what books you're reading,recommending and buying as gifts.

Books recommended on today's show.

Jane:

Lie Down in Darkness- William Styron
Ashes to Dust- Yrsa Siguroardottir
The Beautiful Myster- Louise Penny
This is How You Lose Her- Junot Diaz

Linda:

Focus On Brattleboro

Nov 15, 2012
VPR/Ric Cengeri / The new Brattleboro Food Co-Op opened downtown in June.

Over the past several years, Brattleboro has had its share of setbacks. It seemed as if the only news coming out of the southeastern Vermont town was bad news.

The historic Brooks House was severely damaged by fire.Tropical Storm Irene caused extensive damage. A Brattleboro Co-Op employee was murdered by a co-worker. The iconic Latchis Theater marquee was destroyed by a passing truck. But lately, the news from Brattleboro has been much more positive.

Ed Andrieski / AP

An aerial view of an damanged bridge with a construction vehicle nearby.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press File

flickr/Sam T / Maine is one of the states that has voted to approve same-sex marriage.

Gay marriage supporters won big on election night. Same sex marriage laws were upheld in Maine and Maryland, and in Minnesota, a proposed constitutional amendment to limit the definition of marriage was defeated. We'll consider what's next for gay marriage rights in the U.S. Vermont legalized civil unions more than a dozen years ago now and gay marriage in 2009. Have your opinions about gay marriage changed in the last decade? What lessons can activists in other states- on both sides of the issue- take from the battles here in Vermont?

Tangled Up In Blue

Nov 8, 2012
AP/Andy Duback / Republican gubernatorial candidate Randy Brock gives his concession speech alongside his daughter Natalia Brock, left, and wife

http://www.vpr.net/audio/programs/84/2012/11/Spot-1107-08e-Jamaica Mitigation_110712_Keese_Im Susan Keese.mp3

Vermont was once a state of rock-ribbed Republicans, but its; Blue-state; status was solidified on Tuesday, with Republicans losing all but one statewide contest.So where does the Vermont GOP go from here? We take up that question Republican Representative Patti Komline and Oliver Olsen, a Republican who chose not to run for re-election to the House.

VPR/Ric Cengeri

Months of endless campaigning have finally concluded. So now we get down to looking at the statewide results and what they will mean for the direction of the state and the nation over the next several years.

Treasurer Beth Pearce and her opponent Wendy Wilton, Auditor-elect Doug Hoffer and Vince Illuzzi, House Speaker Shap Smith and Attorney General Bill Sorrell reflect on their races and look at what's ahead.

And VPR's Ross Sneyd and Valley News Editor John Gregg provide analysis of the Vermont and New Hampshire races.

AP / Vermont-born Presidents Chester A. Arthur and Calvin Coolidge.

Election Day has finally arrived and as voters head to thepolls, we learn about the American Presidency. Historian and Author Kenneth C. Davis' new book is Don't Know Much About the American Presidents. He joins usto explain why we have a President and not a king and sorts out the electoral college idea. He also looks at the accomplishments of the two Vermont-born Presidents - Chester A. Arthur and Calvin Coolidge.

VPR/Charlotte Albright / State Police Lieutenant Mike Henry and two St. Johnsbury Police officers during the search of a suspected meth lab.

We've seen a number of methamphetamine cases in Vermont lately. The ability to manufacture meth at home is one of the reasons for this rise. So, could someone in your neighborhood be running a meth lab?

U.S. Attorney Tristram Coffin and Spectrum Youth amp; Family Services' Annie Ramniceanu discuss the lure of this drug, why it's so easy to produce and the threat it may pose to your community.

AP/Toby Talbot / Governor Peter Shumlin seeks to win his second gubernatorial campaign next Tuesday.

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