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Jim Burress

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Jim Burress is a proud native of Louisville, Kentucky. He holds a bachelor’s degree in English from Wabash College in Indiana, and a master’s in Mass Communication from Murray State University.  That's where Jim started his public radio career (WKMS-FM). 

Jim moved to Atlanta to work on his PhD, but after a year away from reporting, he realized he preferred the newsroom to the classroom.  He came to WABE in the spring of 2008, where he’s a reporter and host.

As a licensed pilot, Jim loves to fly single-engine Cessna airplanes. His interest in aviation is why you’ll likely hear him report a lot on the commercial aviation industry.   As a Kaiser Health News/NPR fellow, Jim also covers healthcare and healthcare policy for WABE. 

Jim is a regular contributor to the national show Marketplace, and his reports have aired nationally on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered,  and Day to Day.

Jim has won numerous professional awards, including 1st place honors from both the Kentucky and Georgia Associated Press and several regional Edward R. Murrow Awards.  In 2010, the Atlanta Press Club awarded Jim its radio “Award of Excellence” for his reporting on the Atlanta Police Department, and again in 2012 for a joint project looking at Clayton County schools. 

But Jim's biggest prize came in 2001 when he won it all on the game show, "The Price is Right." 

  • A debilitating winter storm is creating havoc across the Deep South on Wednesday. As much as a foot of snow is expected in Georgia and the Carolinas. Ice will also be a problem: Forecasters say that up to an inch of it will coat roads and power lines. Jim Burress of member station WABE reports from Atlanta that hundreds of thousands of people are without electricity.
  • A new immigration law in Georgia requires everyone licensed by the state to prove citizenship. But the law is having an unintended consequence: many health care workers, included doctors and nurses, are losing their licenses because of a paperwork backlog.