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Kelly, 2015. Stephen Voss/NPR.

Kelly McEvers

Kelly McEvers is a two-time Peabody Award-winning journalist and former host of NPR's flagship newsmagazine, All Things Considered. She spent much of her career as an international correspondent, reporting from Asia, the former Soviet Union, and the Middle East. She is the creator and host of the acclaimed Embedded podcast, a documentary show that goes to hard places to make sense of the news. She began her career as a newspaper reporter in Chicago.

  • Police in Albuquerque, N.M., have shown a pattern of excessive force that violates the Constitution, a federal report says. The department is changing policies; families are demanding accountability.
  • Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced plans Monday to merge the two agencies responsible for recovering and identifying U.S. war dead. The decision is partly a response to congressional pressure.
  • As the U.S. recovers from the Great Recession, one fact that's emerging is that while jobs are coming back, most of these jobs are either high- or low-paying jobs. Middle-class jobs are not coming back, and it's evident in towns across the Midwest like Lincoln, Ill.
  • The accuracy of Al-Jazeera's reporting has come under criticism in the past, and now the network is taking a hit amid claims it slanted its coverage in favor of the Muslim Brotherhood during Egypt's recent political crisis. At stake, too, is the credibility of Al-Jazeera's main backer, Qatar.
  • As Egyptians broke their fast at sundown Friday, rival groups staged separate demonstrations in public squares. Supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi are vowing to remain in the streets until their leader is reinstated.
  • NPR's Kelly McEvers found herself crying unpredictably during the Arab Spring, when friends were being kidnapped and worse. Why do otherwise intelligent people risk their lives to report on conflicts? In a new hourlong radio documentary, she turns the mic on herself to search for an answer.
  • A director spent a year filming the Alawite community in the Syrian coastal city of Tartous, where many believe President Bashar Assad is the only man who can save them from the mostly Sunni Muslims leading the country's rebellion.
  • The Alawites have a history of siding with former dictator Syrian Hafez Assad and his son, President Bashar Assad, who are also members of the Shiite minority. But during a recent gathering in Cairo, some said they're willing to take the risk and denounce the regime after burying so many of their own.
  • In 2007, NPR told the story of two sisters who had lost their parents. The older sister wore conservative clothes and recited poetry. The younger sister, just 13 at the time, appeared on the verge of becoming a prostitute. Now, 10 years after the U.S. invaded Iraq, we hear what happened to them.
  • Um Abbas has spent decades performing the Muslim ritual of washing the bodies of the dead to prepare them for burial. The war years in Iraq were terrible, she says, but in some ways, confronting death every day helped her cope with the country's trauma.