Liam Elder-Connors

Reporter

Liam is VPR's reporter covering Burlington and Chittenden County.

He also serves as an occasional fill-in host for Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Liam  joined VPR in 2015 as a board operator, announcer and producer before spending a year as the Morning Edition producer.  Before switching to full-time reporting in 2018, he was the All Things Considered producer and editor.

Liam graduated from St. Michael's College in 2014 with a degree in journalism and music.

Ways to Connect

A woman wearing a mask leans against a couch in a carpeted living room, with skylights.
James Buck / Seven Days

The stairs reminded Tina Fede that she was sick. The little residential care home she manages in Bennington has just one flight, and she usually trots up and down it without a thought. Now the steps left her short of breath.

A hand holds a cane.
James Buck / Seven Days and VPR File

The focus on COVID-19 last year didn't mean that the typical problems in Vermont's eldercare facilities went away.

Lara Dickson / For VPR

As state regulators focused on the COVID-19 pandemic, there were severe lapses in care at residential facilities. Plus, a second public hearing on pensions, COVID-19 numbers, and lake trout.

Lara Dickson / For VPR

A staffing agency helping Vermonters in recovery find work. Plus, Vermont State Police pledges to increase women in the force, a farmer threatens the Secretary of Agriculture, and COVID-19 numbers.

Lara Dickson / For VPR

Vermont’s Attorney General has refiled charges in three high-profile murder or attempted murder cases in the past two years, including one just last week. Plus, a plan for the state’s pension system, the high cost of universal school meals, and a call for elected leaders to denounce hate crimes against Asians and Asian Americans.

A woman, Pam Reith, wearing a teal sweater, holds a portrait of her mother, Beverly Peterson, in front of a piano.
James Buck / Seven Days

In late 2019, Seven Days and Vermont Public Radio published a series of stories that revealed Vermont's state-regulated eldercare facilities often failed their mostly elderly denizens, with medical errors and accidents leading to harm and even deaths.

Lara Dickson / For VPR

Isolation during the pandemic has had devastating effects on residents of eldercare facilities. Plus, almost a third of Vermonters vaccinated, Gov. Scott to get his shot, and peregrine falcons.

Lara Dickson / For VPR

What an ice core has to teach us about climate change. Plus, tapping trees (not just maple), vaccination disparities, and COVID-19 numbers.

A collage of portraits of people who died after contracting COVID-19 in Vermont.
Elodie Reed / VPR

More than 200 Vermonters have died from COVID-19 since the pandemic began. Brave Little State looks back on a year of loss.

A photo, close-up, of a Moderna COVID-19 vaccine box with red lettering on blue cardboard and a blue rim.
Paul Sancya / The Associated Press

More than 200 people in Vermont have died of COVID-19 over the past year. About a quarter of those deaths occurred in the first two months of the pandemic.

A collage of portraits of people who died after contracting COVID-19 in Vermont.
Elodie Reed / VPR

It’s been almost exactly one year since Vermont’s first COVID-19 fatality. The virus has killed more than 200 Vermonters so far. The death toll here is small compared to most other states, but the loss of each person ripples out through their family, friends and community.

To better understand the Vermonters who died, VPR reached out to the families of many of the fallen. Here are some of their stories.

Angela Evancie / VPR File

Department of Corrections officials held a press conference Thursday morning about the COVID-19 outbreak at the Northern State Correctional Facility in Newport, which has infected 128 inmates and 10 staff.

A white sign that says "vote here" on a brick street in Burlington.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR File

Next Tuesday is Town Meeting Day, and voters in Vermont's largest city, Burlington, face a choice: Give another term to incumbent Mayor Miro Weinberger or pick a new city leader.

A person walking past a uvm covid-19 testing sign
Elodie Reed / VPR

After nearly two months off, colleges across Vermont are preparing to resume in-person classes — some as early as Feb. 1. Coronavirus numbers have soared around the country during the break, but state and college leaders say the protocols that worked in the fall, with some tweaks, will work again.

A young woman in a mask, faceshield and gloves administers a shot to a man in a mask
Elodie Reed / VPR

The state of Vermont opened its first COVID-19 vaccine clinics for the public Wednesday, giving shots to Vermonters aged 75 and older.

Lara Dickson / For VPR

Despite warnings of armed demonstrations in state capitols over the weekend, Montpelier had a quiet Sunday. Plus, history, race, and the riot at the U.S. Capitol.

Orange cones and a black chain lead to four law enforcement officers on the snowy steps of the Vermont Statehouse
Elodie Reed / VPR

Updated 6 p.m.

Sunday was a mostly quiet day in Montpelier, and the armed protests that law enforcement officials had been preparing for did not materialize.

A gray sign with blue letters reads Brattleboro Police Department against a snowy background
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Two communities at opposite ends of Vermont are pushing forward with efforts to reform their police departments. The moves come in the wake of last year's national reckoning with racial equity and policing, following the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis last summer.

Today, we're checking in on where things stand in these efforts – in Brattleboro and in Burlington.

Lara Dickson / For VPR

What we know about the situation in D.C.

A woman and her son in face masks, leaning together and looking at the camera, with a door behind them.
Elodie Reed / VPR

The pandemic has upended our daily lives and pushed people into tenuous financial situations. Many are making enough for the essentials but extra expenses, reduced income and isolation from loved ones has created anxiety about the future.

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