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Sandy Hausman

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

  • More than 300,000 African and African-American slaves were sold in Shockoe Bottom. Today, residents and city officials are debating how to preserve the area: Memorial or stadium and museum?
  • Nearly three years after the federal government issued guidelines for dealing with sexual misconduct on campus, administrators are meeting at the University of Virginia to discuss problems and progress. As Sandy Hausman of member station WVTF reports, leaders in higher education say they're struggling to understand and manage sexual assaults in the age of "hooking up."
  • With only about 1,000 full-blooded Hawaiians left in the world, preserving native island culture is a huge challenge. One way to do this: teach students and other island residents the ancient art of making poi, a dish that's been feeding native Hawaiians for centuries.
  • It's an old saying in retail: "The customer is always right." But many companies that sell online or through catalogs have moved away from that motto — making customers pay to return merchandise. Sellers think it's a fair policy. Consumers don't see it that way, and a new study suggests that firms would be far better off in the long run footing the bill for returns.