Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

He brings to NPR years of experience as a journalist at a variety of news organizations based all over the world. He came to NPR from The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, where he worked as an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk. Prior to that, Neuman worked in Hong Kong with The Wall Street Journal, where among other things he reported extensively from Pakistan in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as a bureau chief for United Press International.

A native Hoosier, Neuman's roots in public radio (and the Midwest) run deep. He started his career at member station WBNI in Fort Wayne, and worked later in Illinois for WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford and WILL in Champaign-Urbana.

Neuman is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.

First it wasn't a coup. Then, it was.

Now, Thailand's ruling military junta tells foreign journalists that its May 22 toppling of an elected government was no coup after all.

This post was updated at 4:15 a.m. ET Friday:

U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl has arrived at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio after a flight from Ramstein Air Base in Germany, according to a Pentagon spokesman. He will receive medical treatment and will be reunited with his family.

This post was updated at 5:30 p.m. ET

Editors' Note: An earlier version of this post, as well as an accompanying breaking news alert, incorrectly stated that Ruby Dee had won an Oscar for her role in American Gangster. Dee was nominated for the award but did not win.

Ruby Dee, an actress and civil rights activist who built a career on stage and screen at a time when African-Americans had few such opportunities, has died at age 91.

Emirates Airlines has backed out of a deal it signed seven years ago to buy 70 Airbus A350s, a major blow to the European plane-maker that could prove a windfall for Chicago-based Boeing.

The canceled order for 50 A350-900s and 20 of the larger A350-1000s, to be delivered in 2019, had been worth $16 billion at the time the deal was inked in 2007.

Days after some 100,000 people marched in Hong Kong to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the brutal crackdown on pro-democracy activists in Beijing's Tiananmen Square, China has issued a policy paper making it clear that the former British colony's autonomy only goes so far.

The release of the 14,500-word "white paper" sparked protests on Wednesday in the territory, which has been known as the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, or HKSAR, since it reverted to Beijing in 1997.

Police have identified the gunman who killed a student and wounded a teacher at an Oregon high school before fatally shooting himself Tuesday. Jared Michael Padgett, 15, was armed with an "AR-15-type" rifle, a semi-automatic handgun, a large knife and several magazines of ammunition, authorities say.

Tuesday's shooting took place in a gym that was detached from the main building at Reynolds High School in the Portland suburb of Troutdale.

More than two centuries after one of the ships in British Capt. George Vancouver's flotilla lost an anchor in Puget Sound, a group of amateur divers are convinced the object they've brought to the surface is the very same.

A four-person rescue team in the German Alps has reached a trapped cave researcher who was injured in a rock fall some three-quarters of a mile below ground. But figuring out how to move him is proving a challenge.

Japan, which earlier this year said it would scale back what it has described as "research whaling," is signaling that it wants to go back to a larger hunt.

"I want to aim for the resumption of commercial whaling by conducting whaling research," Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said.

Japan, which is a signatory to a 1986 International Whaling Commission moratorium, has nonetheless continued to hunt cetaceans using a loophole in the ban that allows taking some whales for scientific purposes.

China is calling a friendly get-together between soldiers of Vietnam and the Philippines on islands in the South China Sea claimed by Beijing "a clumsy farce," demanding that the two countries cease-and-desist.

A computer program masquerading as a 13-year-old Ukrainian boy has reached a technological and philosophical threshold by passing the so-called Turing Test: it fooled a third of its human interlocutors into believing they were conversing with a real person instead of a machine.

A man armed with an assault rifle, several hand grenades, smoke bombs and tear gas opened fire on an Atlanta courthouse, where he was scheduled to plead guilty on drug charges Friday. The assault sparked a gunbattle with police that left the assailant dead and a deputy wounded.

The three-minute shootout ended in the death of Denis Marx, 48, according to Forsyth County Sheriff Duane Piper, who says the suspect had a history with the department, including at least two arrests on drug charges.

A day after General Motors admitted it failed customers who owned cars with a defective ignition switch, the automaker issued a recall for 105,000 more vehicles, bringing the total number of GM recalls so far this year to 34, involving 14 million vehicles, Michigan Public Radio's Tracy Samilton reports.

President Bill Clinton's administration wondered what the legal consequences would be if the White House acknowledged that genocide was occurring in Rwanda in 1994, according to newly public documents.

Uber and Lyft car services have said they will continue to operate in Virginia, despite a cease-and-desist letter from the state saying the service is illegal because it hasn't received authorization from the Department of Motor Vehicles.

It comes a day after Colorado became the first state to pass a law regulating such companies, which use smartphone apps to connect passengers with drivers of vehicles for hire and ridesharing services and have seen fast growth in recent years in some parts of the country.

North Dakota is no longer the only state to have its same-sex marriage ban go unchallenged: Seven couples on Friday filed suit in federal court in Fargo seeking to overturn a 2004 voter-approved amendment to the state's Constitution prohibiting the practice.

The Associated Press reports:

The Beastie Boys have won a $1.7 million verdict against the makers of Monster Energy drink in a copyright infringement dispute over the company's use of the band's songs in a 2012 promotional video.

Want to know where most motorists hit deer? To answer such a question, at least in Utah, used to involve the laborious task of sifting through mountains of paperwork. And the results weren't even all that accurate.

But a team of scientists at Utah State University has developed a smartphone application to make the task easier, and is hoping that "citizen scientists" will help compile a roadkill database.

Not the wisest of moves: A man impersonating a police officer in Florida signals a real sheriff's detective driving an unmarked car to pull over.

WESH in Orlando reports that the suspect, 20-year-old Matthew Lee McMahon, "activated a red and blue light Monday while driving behind an unmarked county sheriff's car."

Senators from both parties have reached an agreement on legislation that would expand the ability of veterans to seek government-paid medical care outside the network of the VA medical system.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont who is chairman of the Veterans Affairs Committee, was joined by Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain in making the announcement Thursday on the Senate floor.

The Associated Press reports:

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