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The home for VPR's coverage of health and health industry issues affecting the state of Vermont.

How Vermont Schools Manage Food Allergies

Keeping kids with allergies away from certain foods is a serious business. We're talking about how schools handle the challenge.
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Keeping kids with allergies away from certain foods is a serious business. We're talking about how schools handle the challenge.

Serious — potentially deadly — food allergies are on the rise among kids. We're looking at how schools manage these situations, with limited resources and a diverse population of children to keep educated and fed. 

What's the best way to keep those with allergies safe without isolating them or instituting unduly draconian regulations around food and eating — and how can schools get other kids and parents on board?

We're talking with Sharonlee Trefry, the school nurse consultant for the state of Vermont.

Post your questions and comments below, or email us at vermontedition@vpr.net.

Broadcast live on Monday, Sept. 18, 2017 at noon; rebroadcast at 7 p.m.

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