Vermont Edition

Weekdays at Noon & 7:00pm

Monday, March 18, 2019

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

  • Live call-in discussion: Lets talk potholes - how they form, what we can do to stop the invasion.
  • The regional producer of the Moth brings us her tips for good storytelling.

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The Barge Canal on Pine Street in Burlington is one of 14 Superfund cleanup sites in Vermont.
Alden Pellett / Associated Press/File

They were everything from tanneries to landfills to copper mines. They are Vermont's 14 Superfund sites; locations that were so polluted they required a long-term cleanup plan of the hazardous material contaminations. We'll "visit" some of them at a time when the Environmental Protection Agency is doing five-year reviews of six of the sites.

Montpelier author Katherine Paterson is being recognized for her body of work in children's literature.
courtesy Katherine Paterson

Author Katherine Paterson, who lives in Montpelier, is being recognized for “an exceptional lifetime body of work" by the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Paterson is known for books for kids and young adults like Bridge to Terabithia, The Great Gilly Hopkins, Jacob Have I Loved, and many others. She took home this year’s E.B. White Award—a prize she says has personal significance.

A wildlife keeper at VINS shows a barred owl to visitors.
Paul Cooper / flickr

It’s been a rough winter for owls—and the Vermont Institute of Natural Science says it’s mostly affecting young owls experiencing their first winter.

Psychiatric patients in crisis can wait days in emergency departments due to a lack on inpatient beds.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

VPR's investigative reporter Emily Corwin has been looking into the care received by young psychiatric patients in crisis. As with adults, children and adolescents can spend days in hospital emergency departments. And some parents and doctors have complained about the quality and amount of care they receive from psychiatrists while in the ER.

Sen. Patrick Leahy, flanked by Sen. Jon Tester of Montana, left, and Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York, speaks at a February 2019 news conference amid border security negotiations.
Andrew Harnik / AP

Thursday in Washington, Sen. Patrick Leahy voted to block President Donald Trump's emergency declaration on the southern border. We're talking with the Senator about that resolution, security and humanitarian concerns at the Southern border, Sen. Bernie Sanders' 2020 presidential run and more.

Artists Sean (left) Clute and Otto Muller (center) stand among hanging dried stalks of Japanese knotweed with Julian Scott Memorial Gallery director Phillip Robertson.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

A new art exhibit at Northern Vermont University's Johnson campus uses the invasive plant Japanese knotweed to explore concepts of invasiveness and colonization in a multimedia interactive experience.

A scanning electron microscope image of an HIV virus.
Wikimedia Commons

In Vermont, almost 700 people have received care for HIV in the last few years. Vermont Edition spoke to Roy Belcher - an epidemiologist and HIV surveillance coordinator for the state - about what life looks like for Vermonters living with the virus, what has changed and what treatments are available.

On "Vermont Edition" we're talking about growing grains and hops, malting barley locally and how nearby farmers are increasingly contributing to brewing up Vermont-made beverages.
aetb / iStock

You've heard of farm-to-table. But what about farm-to-pint-glass?

Vermont Edition looks at locally-grown hops and grains used in some Vermont-made beers and spirits, why local ingredients can inspire — or bedevil — small brewers or distillers, and how Vermont's climate and soil can give hops and other ingredients distinctive flavors you can taste right in the glass.

A worker installs fiber optic lines in Norton.
Toby Talbot / AP

Despite wide agreement that broadband internet access is crucial to the state's economic development, more than a quarter of Vermont residents are on the wrong side of that digital divide. We're talking about the scale of the challenge and what's being considered to deliver broadband to the state's rural areas, including a new bill that would help towns figure out how to make their own pushes for broadband projects. 

Helen Lyons can be heard hosting mornings on "VPR Classical" weekdays between 7 a.m. and 10 a.m.
Matthew Smith / VPR

Morning listeners to VPR Classical likely noticed a new voice on the air over the last month.

Helen Lyons, a classically-trained soprano who’s performed in genres from opera to chamber music in the U.S., Europe and Asia, joined VPR in February as the new morning host.

Vermonters receive an estimated 145,000 robocalls every day. We're looking at what's behind the rapidly increasing numbers of robocalls.
Kirillm / iStock

Vermonters gets an estimated 4.5 million robocalls each month. Calls from scammers and marketers to an 802 number have doubled in just the last two years. We're looking at what's behind the rise in robocalls and ways you can protect yourself from the flood of unwanted calls.

We're talking about what's been accomplished and what's still to come this legislative session.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Lawmakers will return to the State House next week for the second half of the legislative session to consider a number of issues, including a tax-and-regulate marijuana plan, paid family leave, raising the state minimum wage and changes to Vermont's tax structure.

Stacks of diapers in a row.
Vrabelpeter1 / iStock

Food shelves rarely stock diapers, and families can't use federal subsidies like WIC or SNAP to buy them. To address this need, a new diaper bank is opening to serve communities in Chittenden County.

Voters from the Windham Southeast Unified Union School District stand to be counted at a meeting in Brattleboro. Many towns did not vote on a school budget this Town Meeting Day.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

More than 30 Vermont school districts filed a lawsuit challenging the forced mergers the state has ordered them to make. Before voting on school budgets on Town Meeting Day, the districts involved in the lawsuit asked for a temporary injunction to allow merger proceedings to halt until the suit is resolved. But just one day before Town Meetings, a judge denied that request. 

A sample driver's privilege card from the Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles. Losing the ability to drive can have far-reaching repercussions in Vermont.
Department of Motor Vehicles

Life in a rural state like Vermont can require a lot of driving, and a suspended driver’s license can be a significant hardship. But the demands of work, family and other obligations often mean that many still drive even when they're not supposed to. We're looking at what leads to a suspended license in Vermont and how getting a DLS charge can lead to more citations, larger fines and bigger trouble.

Environmental activists occupy the office of Rep. Steny Hoyer, D-Md., the incoming majority leader, as they try to pressure Democratic support for a sweeping agenda to fight climate change, on Capitol Hill in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

The so-called "Green New Deal" is a set of proposals that would tackle climate change and economic inequality at a national level. The package of policies is unlikely to become law anytime soon, but is spurring debate across the country. We're talking about what exactly is being proposed, and how Vermont fits into the national debate around these ideas.

Col. Greg Knight was selected by legislators as the next Adjutant General for the Vermont National Guard in February.
1st Lt. Mikel Arcovitch / Vermont National Guard

Col. Greg Knight will be the new Adjutant General for the Vermont National Guard. He takes over the position on Friday, March 8.

Knight takes the helm of the reserve militia as it faces 400 empty positions and in the wake of a months-long VTDigger investigation alleging sexual harassment and other misconduct within the Guard.

Underhill residents gather at Town Meeting Day in 2018. "Vermont Edition" looks at how access to voting has changed in Vermont over time and how the question of "who gets to vote" continues to broaden.
Jim Beebe-Woodard

Town Meeting Day reminds Vermonters of how we vote in our unique form of local democracy, but the question of who gets to vote — in elections and at Town Meetings — continues to change. We're talking about how.

Vermont's selection of grocery stores and their offerings are now coming in many shapes, sizes and colors.
Ric Cengeri / VPR FILE

The Vermont grocery store landscape has seen a lot of changes over the last few years. From new players entering the market, to new stores from some familiar stalwarts and new services to entice shoppers. We'll look at how and why the supermarket scene is changing in Vermont.

Special Series: Part 5 Of 'My Heart Still Beats'

Mar 1, 2019

The opioid epidemic has hit emergency rooms hard all over the country. As ERs have seen more patients with serious problems related to opioid use, they’ve struggled to find ways to help. But many hospitals and centers are trying a new form of support: trained "recovery coaches" who work alongside medical staff. Part five of My Heart Still Beats — a special series from Writers for Recovery and VPR, which Vermont Edition is airing this week — is about recovery coaching.

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