Vermont Edition

Weekdays at Noon & 7:00pm

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

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What does your life in Vermont look like in the year 2050? We're imagining Vermont at the mid-century and asking you to share what has - and hasn't - changed.
hanibaram / iStock

We're jumping ahead to the year 2050 to imagine what life will be like in Vermont by mid-century, and looking back from an imagined future to talk about how Vermont can address climate change and other challenges. 

David McMillan, Fred Morin and Meredith Erickson are authors of 'Joe Beef: Surviving the Apocalypse: Another Cookbook of Sorts.'
Jonathan Castellino

The iconic Montreal restaurant Joe Beef is known for excess. Now, the two chef-owners of the restaurant have embraced sobriety, and have written a new cookbook that's about food and the apocalypse. We're talking to them about working in the restaurant biz without drinking, and cooking for the end of the world.

Boston Red Sox's David Price (left), catcher Christian Vazquez and pitcher Chris Sale celebrate after winning the 2018 World Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers on Oct. 28, 2018.
Mark J. Terrill / AP

Baseball season is underway, and in Vermont Edition's baseball show we'll look at how teams across the league are stacking up and discuss some big rule changes under consideration that Major League Baseball hopes will shake up — and speed up — the sport.

The return of red-winged blackbirds herald the arrival of spring in Vermont.
Putneypics / Flickr

You might be hearing songs lately that herald the changing of the season, from red-winged blackbirds to sparrows and woodcocks. On Vermont Edition's annual spring bird show, we'll talk bird behavior, the oddities of bird courtship and how lighting up your house at night may impact the migration of some species.

Some 3 billion American chestnut trees succumbed to a fungal blight in the early 1900s. Now an organization dedicated to restoring the tree is seeking approval to release a genetically engineered chestnut tree into the wild.
Public Domain via Pixabay

The once-ubiquitous American chestnut tree is now functionally extinct, nearly erased from the landscape by a blight that killed roughly 3 billion trees over 50 years. Now a nonprofit organization dedicated to restoring the tree is seeking federal approval to release a genetically engineered blight-resistant chestnut into the wild. But is a genetically engineered tree the right way to restore a virtually extinct species?

From tobacco to opioid use, a just-launched study will get a timely snapshot of what substances Vermont's youths and young adults are using.
Master1305 / iStock

Getting an accurate snapshot of what "drugs of choice" young people are using can be extremely difficult. We'll hear about a study just launched in Vermont that aims to provide that information more quickly than in the past.

The month-long "University of Irasburg" is drawing from the town for both teachers and students for classes ranging from conversational Spanish to ways to cook a bear.
Judith Jackson, courtesy

They are a popular trend mixing the important with the ephemeral; "pop-up" shops offer a brief chance to buy boutique wares, while "pop-up" restaurants may only serve meals for a single day. Now in April the Northeast Kingdom town of Irasburg is recruiting students — and teachers — for the month-long "pop-up" University of Irasburg

A white-tailed deer photographed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. We're looking at the proposed changes to deer hunting in Vermont by 2020.
Scott Bauer / USDA

Hunting rules usually change due to shifts in the animal population hunters are harvesting. But in 2020, Vermont’s deer hunting rules are changing for a different reason: a long decline in the number of hunters. That's leading the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department to propose changes from bag limits to antler point restrictions to season structure. We're looking at the proposed changes.

April 15, tax day in the U.S., is fast approaching. We're talking about what's changed at the federal and state level that will impact how you file.
BackyardProduction / istock

Tax day — Monday, April 15 — is approaching fast. And this year, many people's returns may look significantly different than in years past, due to the law that overhauled the country's tax code starting in 2018. We're taking your questions and talking about what you need to know, including new tax rates and some big changes in standard and itemized deductions.

As representatives of the region's dairy industry get ready to meet at a summit, "Vermont Edition" assembles a roundtable of dairy farmers to discuss the state of the business.
Ric Cengeri / VPR FILE

There's a lot of talk about the struggles dairy farmers are facing, the continuing loss of Vermont farms and ways to improve or restructure the dairy industry. We're hearing from dairy farmers themselves about the challenges, the future and the changes they'd make to the system. And why they continue to do this difficult work.

In September 2018, former Gov. Madeleine Kunin joined "Vermont Edition" and a live audience to discuss her new book, "Coming of Age: My Journey to the Eighties."
Anna Ste Marie / VPR

During VPR's March Membership Drive Vermont Edition is featuring special episodes showcasing some of the best recent shows and collecting interviews with notable Vermonters. Few are more notable than the only woman to ever lead the state, former Gov. Madeleine Kunin.

People walk on the Stanford University campus, one of the institutions caught up in an alleged conspiracy around admissions.
Ben Margot / AP

An alleged conspiracy revealed this month involved rich parents paying huge sums to get their kids into college via bribery and fraud. The story also focused attention on the legal ways that the wealthy can get a leg up. We're looking behind the scenes at college admissions.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller walks past the White House on Sunday, March 24, 2019, just days after delivering his findings in the Russia investigation and the Trump presidential campaign.
Cliff Owen / AP

The findings from Special Counsel Robert Mueller mean talk of impeaching President Trump are likely over, according to Garrett Graff, a Vermont-based reporter who’s followed Mueller's career for years. 

The Beta Technologies prototype Ava XC lands during a test flight at the Plattsburgh International Airport.
Eric Adams / Courtesy Beta Technologies

This special Vermont Edition collects recent interviews that highlight technological innovations being developed in our area. We'll hear about cutting-edge cartography, a tactile sketchpad that helps blind students in subjects that require graphing and an electric air taxi.

We're talking about the debate over life without parole in Vermont.
powerofforever / iStock

Life in prison with no chance of parole is the harshest punishment possible in Vermont. Some see it as a necessary sentence for the worst crimes, whiles others see it as an unforgiving punishment devoid of hope for rehabilitation. We're talking about what life without parole means for public safety, rehabilitation and deterrence, and for the cost of the justice system in Vermont.

Warmer winters mean ticks are taking a toll on the moose population. We're featuring some of our recent coverage of the local impacts on climate change.
Elliot Black / flickr

Vermont Edition is featuring some of our recent coverage of climate change on our region - including significant changes for weather, wildlife and agriculture. Plus: discussion of what we can do on local and global levels to combat climate change and effectively deal with its effects.

Forest therapy guide Duncan Murdoch takes in his surroundings in Arms Forest in Burlington.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

Forest bathing is an English interpretation of the Japanese term shinrin-yoku and it is the idea that spending time in nature in an alert but relaxed manner has healing and rejuvenating benefits. But why, in a state where many Vermonters already feel connected to the natural landscape around them, would someone pay to go on a forest bathing excursion with a forest therapy guide? Vermont Edition went to find out.

Failure to recognize faces - even of those familiar to a person - is called prosopagnosia or face blindness and it affects about two percent of the population.
Missbobbit / iStock

Most of us take for granted the ability to recognize the faces of our friends and loved ones. But for about two percent of individuals, it isn't that easy. They have a condition called prosopagnosia or face blindness. Brad Duchaine, Dartmouth College professor of psychological and brain sciences, joins us to discuss the latest research in this field.

"The Moth" offers storytellers the opportunity to sharpen their skills in front of a live audience. Marlon "Big Fish" Fisher is shown hosting a local Moth event.
Ty Robertson / VPR FILE

Everyone has interesting things happen to them - at least once in a while - but not everyone knows how to tell a good story about their experiences. Susanne Schmidt is someone who does. She's a storyteller and regional producer of The Moth, which puts on storytelling events across the country.

"Vermont Edition" collects interviews from four graphic novelists, featuring work from (clockwise from top left) Jason Lutes, Alison Bechdel, Rachel Lindsay, and James Sturm.
DRAWN AND QUARTERLY / Meg Malone for VPR / RACHEL LINDSAY

A special Vermont Edition collects interviews with cartoonists and graphic novel creators, showcasing local work in the unique art form that presents novel-length stories in a comic strip format. It's a combination of words and images that doesn't shy away from difficult subjects: these Vermont cartoonists tackle mental health, crumbling marriages, world wars and the current political climate.

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