Books

David Reinert holds a Q sign while waiting in line at a campaign rally for President Donald Trump in Wilkes-Barre, PA in August 2018. The "QAnon" conspiracy is an example of what a new book calls the "new conspiracism."
Matt Rourke / AP

Conspiracy theories are about as old as governments themselves. But "the new conspiracism" is something new and different; it's conspiracy without the theory, say the authors of a new book on conspiracy thinking. We're talking about the new conspiracism and how it disorients our conversations and affects democracy, institutions and daily life.

A black-and-white photo of Sinclair Lewis sitting in a lawn chair at Twin Farms
Vermont Historical Society, courtesy

This month on Brave Little State: Exploring the literary luminaries of Vermont, and why so many writers seem to thrive in the Green Mountain State.

A row of books and a DCF sign hanging below it.
Meg Malone / VPR

The Vermont Department of Libraries will be changing the name of the Dorothy Canfield Fisher Children's Book Award.

A teacher holds an open book and points at it while students look on.
Meg Malone / VPR

A group of fifth- and sixth-graders are in the library of Orleans Elementary School working on making “'zines.” 'Zines are like personal mini magazines, and they're a favorite hobby of Malú, the main character in The First Rule of Punk by Celia C. Pérez.

David McMillan, Fred Morin and Meredith Erickson are authors of 'Joe Beef: Surviving the Apocalypse: Another Cookbook of Sorts.'
Jonathan Castellino

The iconic Montreal restaurant Joe Beef is known for excess. Now, the two chef-owners of the restaurant have embraced sobriety, and have written a new cookbook that's about food and the apocalypse. We're talking to them about working in the restaurant biz without drinking, and cooking for the end of the world.

The cover of Elizabeth Powell's book Concerning the Holy Ghost's Interpretation of J. Crew Catalogues.
Leaky Boot Press

Have you ever leafed through a catalogue and wondered about the behind-the-scenes efforts to get consumers to covet those items? A new book by Vermont writer Elizabeth Powell, called Concerning the Holy Ghost's Interpretation of J. Crew Catalogues, explores this concept.

In September 2018, former Gov. Madeleine Kunin joined "Vermont Edition" and a live audience to discuss her new book, "Coming of Age: My Journey to the Eighties."
Anna Ste Marie / VPR

During VPR's March Membership Drive Vermont Edition is featuring special episodes showcasing some of the best recent shows and collecting interviews with notable Vermonters. Few are more notable than the only woman to ever lead the state, former Gov. Madeleine Kunin.

A group of students at Champlain Elementary School's library - some standing, some sitting, some kneeling - looking toward the camera.
Meg Malone / VPR

Beyond the Bright Sea takes place in 1925 on a string of small islands called the Elizabeths, off the coast of Woods Hole, Massachusetts. The novel is a work of historical fiction, but it was mystery and suspense that grabbed — and held — the attention of a group of Dorothy's List readers at Burlington's Champlain Elementary School.

"Vermont Edition" collects interviews from four graphic novelists, featuring work from (clockwise from top left) Jason Lutes, Alison Bechdel, Rachel Lindsay, and James Sturm.
DRAWN AND QUARTERLY / Meg Malone for VPR / RACHEL LINDSAY

A special Vermont Edition collects interviews with cartoonists and graphic novel creators, showcasing local work in the unique art form that presents novel-length stories in a comic strip format. It's a combination of words and images that doesn't shy away from difficult subjects: these Vermont cartoonists tackle mental health, crumbling marriages, world wars and the current political climate.

Montpelier author Katherine Paterson is being recognized for her body of work in children's literature.
courtesy Katherine Paterson

Author Katherine Paterson, who lives in Montpelier, is being recognized for “an exceptional lifetime body of work" by the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Paterson is known for books for kids and young adults like Bridge to Terabithia, The Great Gilly Hopkins, Jacob Have I Loved, and many others. She took home this year’s E.B. White Award—a prize she says has personal significance.

Right As Rain book cover, features two kids sitting next to each other
HarperCollins

Lindsey Stoddard has something in common with Rain, the narrator of her new young adult novel Right As Rain. Like the young girl whose life is uprooted when she abruptly moves from Vermont to New York City's Spanish Harlem neighborhood, Stoddard has experienced a similar locale change as well.

The Everything That follows: A Novel cover, by Meg Little Reilly. It shows the front of a boat during a rainstorm.
Courtesy, Meg Little Reilly / Publisher: MIRA Books

A woman named Kat hesitates when she's invited to take a boating trip on Martha's Vineyard, but she ultimately decides to go. Everything that follows turns her life into a nightmare — and Everything That Follows is also the title of this novel by Vermonter Meg Little Reilly.

A group of fifth- and sixth-grade students, some standing some sitting on a couch, and looking at the camera
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Mars is a very different place from Earth. But for Liam and his friend Phoebe, the main characters in the science fiction novel Last Day on Mars, the Earth colony on Mars is the only home they have ever known.

James Sturm's new graphic novel is "Off Season."
courtesy Drawn & Quarterly

In his new graphic novel Off Season, cartoonist James Sturm charts the narrative of one couple trying to cope with the bewildering unraveling of their marriage and the political landscape of the 2016 presidential election.

Three students sit at a table with a poster of drawn book spines hanging on the wall in the background.
Meg Malone / VPR

In Ban This Book some of 9-year-old Amy Anne Ollinger’s favorite books have started to disappear off her school library's shelves, and she discovers that adults are challenging the books and the school board is banning them from the library.

Dorothy’s List readers at Montpelier’s Kellogg-Hubbard Library had a lot to say about banned and challenged books — especially when they discovered some of their favorite titles have been questioned.

The cover of Chard deNiord's book I Would Like To You If I Could: Interviews with Ten American Poets. It has a blue-green background.
University of Pittsburgh Press, Courtesy

Vermont's poet laureate, Chard deNiord, took up a different role recently: interviewing other poets about their lives and work. The result is a book called I Would Lie to You if I Could: Interviews with Ten American Poets.

M.T. Anderson accepts the 2006 National Book Award for Young People's Literature and speaks at a podium with the National Book logo.
Stuart Ramson / Associated Press

Vermont-based author M.T. Anderson is this year's winner of the American Library Association's Margaret A. Edwards Award. It's an annual honor recognizing an author's body of work in the area of young adult literature.

A group of students gather around a laptop computer
Meg Malone / VPR

The historical novel Refugee weaves the stories of three refugee families fleeing their homes in different parts of the world and during different time periods: Germany in the 1930s, Cuba in the 1990s and Syria just a few years ago.

Author Emily Bernard with her book.
Bayla Metzger / VPR

Emily Bernard has stories to tell. Some are hers and some were passed down by family members, but all of them connect in a deeply personal way to her sense of being as a black woman in America. The essays are collected in a new book called "Black Is the Body: Stories From My Grandmother's Time, My Mother's Time, and Mine."

The Monumental Arch in Palmyra, Syria in 2003, is one of the 100 photographs of pre-war Syria captured by Shaftsbury photographer Kevin Bubriski in "Legacy In Stone."
Kevin Bubriski

Syria—and its nearly decade-long civil war—has been the subject of countless news stories and foreign policy debates. Syrians fleeing violence from war and the Islamic State weigh heavily in the international conversation about refugees and migration.

In 2003, Shaftsbury photographer Kevin Bubriski started documenting what would become some of the final images of pre-war Syria. His stark black-and-white pictures of the architecture, places and people of Syria are collected in a new book called Legacy In Stone: Syria Before War.

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