Brave Little State

Congressman Peter Welch poses for a portrait outside his office at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington, D.C.
Eman Mohammed for VPR

Sure, you might occasionally see Vermont's U.S. House representative when he's back in the Green Mountains — but what does Peter Welch's life on Capitol Hill look like?

Congressman Peter Welch makes a phone call from his office at Capitol Hill building in Washington, D.C.
Eman Mohammed for VPR

Normally our show answers your questions about Vermont, our region and its people. This month, we decided to do something a little different.

Volunteers help block, split and stack firewood as part of the wood bank firewood program at the United Way of Lamoille County.
United Way of Lamoille County, courtesy

January's Brave Little State looks at the pros and cons of heating with wood. About 38 percent of Vermont homes burn wood for some kind of heat. Almost a fifth of all households rely on wood as their primary way of staying warm.

But when Vermonters who heat with wood face the choice of heating their home or putting food on the table, it often falls to donation-based and volunteer-staffed wood banks to offer enough wood to help out.

Firewood stacked in a shed.
Emily Corwin / VPR

“What are the environmental and economic benefits of wood heat in Vermont? And then what are the costs to that?” That question comes to Brave Little State from Coco Moseley of Lincoln, who – like many Vermonters – heats her family’s home with an antique wood stove.

Emmet Moseley loads a log into his wood stove.
Emily Corwin / VPR

In the winter, Coco and Emmet Moseley keep their farmhouse cozy and warm with an antique wood stove — and Coco is wondering about the benefits and drawbacks of their heat source.

Rep. Peter Welch and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi at Welch's ceremonial swearing in on Capitol Hill on Thursday, Jan. 3, 2019. The two Congress members stand in front of American flags.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

As the balance of power shifts in Washington, Brave Little State collected your questions for Vermont Rep. Peter Welch to shape our upcoming episode.

Rep. Peter Welch stands at a podium with a Democratic Party banner behind him.
Angela Evancie / VPR

When Congress reconvenes next month, Rep. Peter Welch will be part of the Democratic majority in the U.S. House — the party's first majority since 2011. What role will he play in the new balance of power?

“What does it take to start and run a successful small business in Vermont?” That’s the question that VPR podcast Brave Little State answers in its December 2018 episode.

Host Angela Evancie talks to VPR's Mitch Wertlieb about how the people-powered podcast model works, plus we play an excerpt from the episode to learn about what sparked the curiosity for this month's question-asker and hear advice from small-business owners in Vermont.

Antoinette and Clint Hunt, co-founders of Abracadabra Coffee Co. in Woodstock, stand in front of their coffee roaster.
Angela Evancie / VPR

What do you do when you want to start something new, but you don’t know exactly how?

“Why Are There So Many African-Americans Incarcerated In Vermont?” That’s the question VPR podcast Brave Little State answers in its November 2018 episode. Host Angela Evancie talks about how the people-powered podcast model works; who asked this month’s question; and how she and reporter John Dillon began to unravel the answer.

Mirror Images / istockphoto.com

Overall, Vermont has one of the lowest incarceration rates in the country — but one of the highest rates of African-American incarceration. So why is that?

“What’s it like to hike the Long Trail?” That’s the question that VPR podcast Brave Little State answers in its October 2018 episode. Host Angela Evancie talks about how the people-powered podcast model works, where this month’s question came from, and shares a bit about the trail.

Angela Evancie / VPR

The 272-mile Long Trail follows Green Mountain ridgelines from one end of Vermont to another. So what’s it like to hike the whole thing?

Logo for JOLTED, a five-part podcast about a school shooting that didn't happen, the line between thought and crime, and a Republican governor in a rural state who changed his mind about gun laws.
Aaron Shrewsbury for VPR

This month on Brave Little State, we interrupt our regular question-asking to bring you the first installment of JOLTED, a new five-part podcast from the VPR newsroom.

Angela Evancie / VPR

Want to have a say in the question that Brave Little State explores for our October episode? Now's your chance to vote!

Angela Evancie / VPR

You know the feeling. You’re driving along, somewhere in Vermont, and you turn onto a road with an intriguing name. And you wonder where it came from.

Angela Evancie / VPR

“Where are all the aging hippies that moved to Vermont during the '60s and '70s, and what are they doing now?”

Artist Lois Eby, farmer Greg Cox and Supreme Court Associate Justice Marilyn Skoglund.
Amy Noyes/Nina Keck/Angela Evancie / VPR

For the free-thinkers and radicals who moved to Vermont in the 1960s and 1970s, the past may be obscured in a cloud of … wood … smoke. But what does the present look like?

A photo collage featuring, from left, the exterior of a prison, a close-up of a tick, and a Vermont landscape.
From left: Peter Hirschfeld/VPR; ErikKarits/iStockphoto.com; Angela Evancie/VPR

Want to have a say in the question that Brave Little State explores for our August episode? Now's your chance to vote!

'Brave Little State' host Angela Evancie.
Angela Evancie / VPR

In an AMA Friday, VPR's resident podcast master Angela Evancie let the Vermont reddit community ask her "anything" and did her best to answer! Here are three things you don't want to miss.