commentary

Mizina / iStock

This winter, college-bound students applied for scholarships administered by Vermont Student Assistance Corporation, including the Nordic Educational Scholarship of the Vermont Business Roundtable. This year, one hundred and thirty nine applications were received with forty five finalists making it to our selection committee. These scholarships support students seeking a certificate or two-year technical degree.

Katie Titterton

It’s not uncommon for my infant son to get handed around a boardroom table. I’m self-employed and work from home, so I usually schlep him along to meetings where I know he’s welcome.

Torti: The Need To Listen

Mar 11, 2019
VCWA staff

Last month I attended a meeting that could have been ruined by the type of finger pointing and adolescent truculence that characterizes most of our political debate and diplomacy these days. But remarkably, what transpired should serve as the model for civil discourse between people holding opposing world views.

Stephanie Greene

With the senate passing a bill (S84) exempting almost a quarter of Vermont vehicles from emissions testing, we have to tighten up other sources of emissions – including one that might be less painful fix. We have a no-idling law in Vermont designed to prevent those emissions from being released into our already overburdened atmosphere. But it turns out the law is pretty forgiving.

A wide shot view of the crowd gathered at the Women's March Vermont, with snow on the ground, taken from the Vermont Statehouse steps.
Bayla Metzger / VPR

There is a new women’s movement in America. The first indicator was the Women’s March two years ago when women took to the streets in record numbers and demanded that their voices be heard.

Courtesy of UVM

Known as Kake Walk, one of the highlights of the campus social calendar, it’s been described as “a standard act in minstrel theatre, originated on plantations as a competition among slaves” and UVM now has a digital collection of 231 items documenting it that date from 1895 onward.

Heather Geoffrey / Main Street Arts

Thirty years ago Mary Hepburn saw the need for a town arts center in Saxtons River. And her vision was comprehensive. The arts building would include performance and gallery space, and it would offer education for all levels of arts enthusiasts, from Crayolas to musical theater. Today Main Street Arts – or MSA - owns two buildings.

Jose Luis Magana / AP

I’m a young, black, cis-gendered man, and when it comes to the issues that impact Black men every day I want to claim a place at the table, too.

Stafford: Time To Tap

Feb 11, 2019
Luke Q. Stafford

Supporting your local economy; it’s a virtue many Vermonters seem to hold dear. So here’s a seasonally-appropriate tip for improving an economy so local, it’s literally in many backyards. 

Timothy McQuiston

The first place my wife and I had was a great apartment with an eat-in kitchen, two full baths, washer-dryer, porches, wood stove and even a jetted tub. We were lucky to get it. The place was just sitting empty and no one knew it, including the landlord.

Brian A. Jackson / iStock

With apologies to Henry David Thoreau, I’ve lately come to think that the mass of people, or at least a great many of us, are leading lives of noisy desperation.

Mares: Seeing Yo Yo Ma

Jan 24, 2019
Mares

Just this week, superstar cellist Yo Yo Ma made headlines again when he surprised a small group of onlookers with an outdoor, informal performance in Mumbai, India. One lucky observer said it left him ‘spellbound.’

courtesy of Stowe Farmers Market

A few years ago the book: Hardwick the Town Food Saved brought national attention to the small Northeast Kingdom Vermont town. The book profiled four entrepreneurs with a shared vision and a commitment to a locally focused ag and food economy.

An obliging passer-by

Here’s a little something to think about over the weekend, as women once again march for equal rights and the nation remembers Martin Luther King.

Last summer, Dewayne Johnson, a former school groundskeeper, made history when he sued the agrochemical corporation, Monsanto, for causing his non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and won. The jury ruled that Monsanto's weed killer, Roundup, had caused his terminal cancer.

Marseda Halilaj

Like it or not, I’m a Vermonter, born and raised. But despite considering Vermont my home, when I meet people for the first time, their most typical reaction is the quintessential question “where are you really from?”, a surprised comment about my English, or stares that have become a discomforting norm – all of which means that I navigate Vermont in a way my peers don’t.

Vermont Department of Forests, Parks & Recreation

It was the first day of winter and the sun was out. My wife Susan and I took our dog Noel for a hike up Mt. Philo. Noel, ever the social animal, kept going up to one couple, and that opened up a conversation. When I heard their accent, I asked if they were from Montreal. No, they said, they were Hungarians visiting from New York.

Moulton

In anticipation of heading into the last year of our second decade of the second millennium I asked my friends on social media to share with me their hopes, fears, and aspirations for 2019.

John Vogel

About a year ago, Governor Phil Scott announced the sale of revenue bonds, representing the single, largest investment in affordable housing in Vermont’s history.

Kent McFarland

You may remember how on road trips the windshield used to become so plastered with bug bodies that it was hard to see through it - or how hundreds of fireflies seemed to be blinking from every patch of grass on warm summer evenings.

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