Congress

Catch Up With Vermont's Congressional Delegation

Sen. Patrick Leahy | Sen. Bernie Sanders | Rep. Peter Welch

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

Calling it "a great thing to do," President Trump declared a national emergency on Friday in order to help finance a long-promised wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. It's a highly unusual move from an unconventional president.

Spending negotiators may have reached an agreement on an outline to avoid a government shutdown, but the final legislation is still incomplete less than three days before the Friday deadline.

Updated 4:14 p.m. ET

President Trump said on Tuesday that he's not "happy" with a potential budget deal being worked out by congressional negotiators but added that he doesn't think there will be another partial government shutdown.

Congressman Peter Welch poses for a portrait outside his office at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington, D.C.
Eman Mohammed for VPR

Sure, you might occasionally see Vermont's U.S. House representative when he's back in the Green Mountains — but what does Peter Welch's life on Capitol Hill look like?

Congressman Peter Welch makes a phone call from his office at Capitol Hill building in Washington, D.C.
Eman Mohammed for VPR

Normally our show answers your questions about Vermont, our region and its people. This month, we decided to do something a little different.

New York Republican Rep. Elise Stefanik is deeply worried about her party.

"We are facing a crisis level of Republican women in Congress," Stefanik said on Thursday, noting that there are only 13 Republican women in the U.S. House, down from 23 last session.

Stefanik stepped down as House Republicans' recruitment head last month. But with a new group she's launching, dedicated to boosting women candidates, she still has top Republicans' full attention.

Rep. Peter Welch and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi at Welch's ceremonial swearing in on Capitol Hill on Thursday, Jan. 3, 2019. The two Congress members stand in front of American flags.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

As the balance of power shifts in Washington, Brave Little State collected your questions for Vermont Rep. Peter Welch to shape our upcoming episode.

Looking outward and upward at the U.S. Capitol Rotunda. There are statues but really no people, as a partial shutdown is in effect.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / Associated Press

The partial federal government shutdown continues — and it looks like the shutdown will last into the new year.

Headshot of Republican Sen. John McCain.
Cliff Owen / Associated Press

The members of Vermont’s congressional delegation are all remembering the late Sen. John McCain. The Republican senator from Arizona died Saturday at the age of 81.

Special counsel Robert Mueller leaving the capitol in June 2017.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

More than a year into the Donald Trump presidency, special counsel Robert Mueller is conducting multiple ongoing investigations.

These include probes into whether Trump and his campaign accepted help from Russia to win the 2016 election, and whether the president himself obstructed justice after he did.

A protester outside the White House in Washington, D.C., Thursday. Members of the Vermont House voted Friday to oppose a decision by the Trump Administration to separate children from undocumented parents at the border.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

The Vermont House has given its tri-partisan approval to a resolution that strongly opposes a decision by the Trump Administration to separate undocumented parents from their children along the Mexican border.

Lenny Burke, a well-known Rutland man whose life was forever changed by a traumatic brain injury has died. Despite the injury he received as a teenager, Burke went on to be instrumental in changing the way people with T.B.I.s are treated. He was 56.
courtesy

Lenny Burke, a man beloved in Rutland for his courage and determination in the face of adversity, has died.

Blood tests. A new federal report looks at the long-term health effects of PFOA.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR file

A new federal report on the health effects of perfluorinated compounds, including PFOA, could force Vermont to lower its safe drinking water standard.

Courtesy, Green Mountain Club

The North Country National Scenic Trail is part dream, part reality. The dream is a continuous footpath running from central North Dakota to Maine. The reality is that about 2,000 miles of the 4,700-mile trail is currently on roads.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Rep. Peter Welch has signed on to a bipartisan letter demanding that the Environmental Protection Agency released a study on the health effects of the chemicals PFOA and PFOS.

Updated at 3:00 p.m. ET

House Speaker Paul Ryan announced Wednesday that he will not seek re-election and will retire in January.

"You all know I did not seek this job," Ryan said, addressing reporters. "I took it reluctantly. ... I have no regrets."

Ryan, 48, cited wanting to be around his adolescent children more often.

Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO of Facebook, arrives for a Capitol Hill Meeting with Sen. Bill Nelson on Monday. Later in the week, Zuckerberg will be testifying before members of Congress about how Facebook data was used in the 2016 election."
J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Sen. Patrick Leahy says Congress should demand that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg give a full accounting about why the company allowed a political consulting firm to obtain profiles of more than 87 million of its users during the 2016 presidential campaign.

Sen. Patrick Leahy wants to know why Facebook allowed a political consulting firm to obtain the personal information of over 50 million of its customers
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

Sen. Patrick Leahy says a decision by Facebook to allow a political consulting firm to obtain profiles of more than 50 million consumers during the 2016 presidential election constitutes a "major national security issue."

Sen. Bernie Sanders on coming to the bottom of an escalator at Capitol Hill on Feb. 9, 2018.
Jose Luis Magana / Associated Press

Sen. Bernie Sanders has kept himself in the national spotlight from his perch in the U.S. Senate. But critics say that hasn’t necessarily been a good thing because they say he’s moved the party too far to the left.

Rep. Peter Welch wants House Republican leaders to hold a vote on several gun control proposals
AP/Toby Talbot

When it comes to taking action on gun control legislation, Rep. Peter Welch says he believes this time is different.

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