Congress

Catch Up With Vermont's Congressional Delegation

Sen. Patrick Leahy | Sen. Bernie Sanders | Rep. Peter Welch

Updated at 12:33 p.m. EST

The Justice Department says it plans to release special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Thursday morning. Here's what you need to know.

What is it?

Updated at 5 p.m. ET

Attorney General William Barr has told congressional leaders that he anticipates being able to give them a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report on his investigation into Russia's interference with the 2016 presidential election by "by mid-April, if not sooner." Democratic lawmakers have been pushing for lawmakers to see the full report without redactions, though members of both parties have called for its public release.

Days after Attorney General William Barr released his four-page summary of special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation report, overwhelming majorities of Americans want the full report made public and believe Barr and Mueller should testify before Congress, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

Only about a third of Americans believe, from what they've seen or heard about the Mueller investigation so far, that President Trump is clear of any wrongdoing. But they are split on how far Democrats should go in investigating him going forward.

Special counsel Robert Mueller's work is done, but the Russia imbroglio likely has a few more encores before the curtain closes.

Attorney General William Barr notified Congress on Sunday of a huge milestone in the saga: Mueller has submitted a report that did not find that President Trump's campaign conspired with the Russians who interfered in the 2016 election.

Updated at 7:46 p.m. ET

Attorney General William Barr received a report on Friday by special counsel Robert Mueller about the findings from Mueller's investigation into the Russian attack on the 2016 presidential election.

Updated at 4:16 p.m. ET

The Republican-controlled Senate approved a resolution to terminate President Trump's national emergency declaration at the U.S.-Mexico border, putting Congress on a path to its first veto confrontation with the Trump administration.

Michael Cohen speaks into a microphone
Jose Luis Magana / Associated Press

President Donald Trump's former lawyer Michael Cohen appeared Wednesday on Capitol Hill before the U.S. House Committee on Oversight and Reform to be questioned about alleged wrongdoing by the president.

Members of Congress have some questions this week for Michael Cohen.

President Trump's former personal lawyer is set to begin a three-day marathon on Tuesday that will take him behind closed doors with the Senate intelligence committee, then before an open session of the House oversight committee on Wednesday and then to a closed House intelligence committee session on Thursday.

Rep. Peter Welch will be dealing a number of controversial issues this week.
Alex Brandon / Associated Press File

It's going to be a busy week in Washington, D.C., for Rep. Peter Welch. The Vermont congressman is right in the middle of the debate over a number of controversial issues.

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

Calling it "a great thing to do," President Trump declared a national emergency on Friday in order to help finance a long-promised wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. It's a highly unusual move from an unconventional president.

Spending negotiators may have reached an agreement on an outline to avoid a government shutdown, but the final legislation is still incomplete less than three days before the Friday deadline.

Updated 4:14 p.m. ET

President Trump said on Tuesday that he's not "happy" with a potential budget deal being worked out by congressional negotiators but added that he doesn't think there will be another partial government shutdown.

Congressman Peter Welch poses for a portrait outside his office at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington, D.C.
Eman Mohammed for VPR

Sure, you might occasionally see Vermont's U.S. House representative when he's back in the Green Mountains — but what does Peter Welch's life on Capitol Hill look like?

Congressman Peter Welch makes a phone call from his office at Capitol Hill building in Washington, D.C.
Eman Mohammed for VPR

Normally our show answers your questions about Vermont, our region and its people. This month, we decided to do something a little different.

New York Republican Rep. Elise Stefanik is deeply worried about her party.

"We are facing a crisis level of Republican women in Congress," Stefanik said on Thursday, noting that there are only 13 Republican women in the U.S. House, down from 23 last session.

Stefanik stepped down as House Republicans' recruitment head last month. But with a new group she's launching, dedicated to boosting women candidates, she still has top Republicans' full attention.

Rep. Peter Welch and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi at Welch's ceremonial swearing in on Capitol Hill on Thursday, Jan. 3, 2019. The two Congress members stand in front of American flags.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

As the balance of power shifts in Washington, Brave Little State collected your questions for Vermont Rep. Peter Welch to shape our upcoming episode.

Looking outward and upward at the U.S. Capitol Rotunda. There are statues but really no people, as a partial shutdown is in effect.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / Associated Press

The partial federal government shutdown continues — and it looks like the shutdown will last into the new year.

Headshot of Republican Sen. John McCain.
Cliff Owen / Associated Press

The members of Vermont’s congressional delegation are all remembering the late Sen. John McCain. The Republican senator from Arizona died Saturday at the age of 81.

Special counsel Robert Mueller leaving the capitol in June 2017.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

More than a year into the Donald Trump presidency, special counsel Robert Mueller is conducting multiple ongoing investigations.

These include probes into whether Trump and his campaign accepted help from Russia to win the 2016 election, and whether the president himself obstructed justice after he did.

A protester outside the White House in Washington, D.C., Thursday. Members of the Vermont House voted Friday to oppose a decision by the Trump Administration to separate children from undocumented parents at the border.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

The Vermont House has given its tri-partisan approval to a resolution that strongly opposes a decision by the Trump Administration to separate undocumented parents from their children along the Mexican border.

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