Donald Trump

Updated at 7:24 p.m. ET

When President Trump learned two years ago that a special counsel had been appointed to investigate Russian interference in the 2016 election, he was distraught.

Trump "slumped back in his chair and said, 'Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my presidency. I'm f***ed,' " according to the report by special counsel Robert Mueller that was released Thursday in redacted form.

Updated at 12:33 p.m. EST

The Justice Department says it plans to release special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Thursday morning. Here's what you need to know.

What is it?

Days after Attorney General William Barr released his four-page summary of special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation report, overwhelming majorities of Americans want the full report made public and believe Barr and Mueller should testify before Congress, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

Only about a third of Americans believe, from what they've seen or heard about the Mueller investigation so far, that President Trump is clear of any wrongdoing. But they are split on how far Democrats should go in investigating him going forward.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller walks past the White House on Sunday, March 24, 2019, just days after delivering his findings in the Russia investigation and the Trump presidential campaign.
Cliff Owen / AP

The findings from Special Counsel Robert Mueller mean talk of impeaching President Trump are likely over, according to Garrett Graff, a Vermont-based reporter who’s followed Mueller's career for years. 

Special counsel Robert Mueller's work is done, but the Russia imbroglio likely has a few more encores before the curtain closes.

Attorney General William Barr notified Congress on Sunday of a huge milestone in the saga: Mueller has submitted a report that did not find that President Trump's campaign conspired with the Russians who interfered in the 2016 election.

Updated at 6:56 p.m. ET

Special counsel Robert Mueller did not find evidence that President Trump's campaign conspired with Russia to influence the 2016 election, according to a summary of findings submitted to Congress by Attorney General William Barr.

"The Special Counsel's investigation did not find that the Trump campaign or anyone associated with it conspired or coordinated with Russia in its efforts to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election," Barr wrote in a letter to leaders of the House and Senate judiciary committees on Sunday afternoon.

Updated at 7:46 p.m. ET

Attorney General William Barr received a report on Friday by special counsel Robert Mueller about the findings from Mueller's investigation into the Russian attack on the 2016 presidential election.

Updated at 4:16 p.m. ET

The Republican-controlled Senate approved a resolution to terminate President Trump's national emergency declaration at the U.S.-Mexico border, putting Congress on a path to its first veto confrontation with the Trump administration.

President Donald Trump at a podium outside the White House.
Susan Walsh / Associated Press

Vermont is joining more than a dozen states suing the Trump administration over its declaration of a national emergency, which is intended to fund construction of a wall along the U.S.-Mexican border.

Michael Cohen speaks into a microphone
Jose Luis Magana / Associated Press

President Donald Trump's former lawyer Michael Cohen appeared Wednesday on Capitol Hill before the U.S. House Committee on Oversight and Reform to be questioned about alleged wrongdoing by the president.

Members of Congress have some questions this week for Michael Cohen.

President Trump's former personal lawyer is set to begin a three-day marathon on Tuesday that will take him behind closed doors with the Senate intelligence committee, then before an open session of the House oversight committee on Wednesday and then to a closed House intelligence committee session on Thursday.

Rep. Peter Welch will be dealing a number of controversial issues this week.
Alex Brandon / Associated Press File

It's going to be a busy week in Washington, D.C., for Rep. Peter Welch. The Vermont congressman is right in the middle of the debate over a number of controversial issues.

The Russia investigation could be on the verge of a spectacular finale — or it could be about to puff out like a damp firecracker.

Or, as has been the case so often before, Washington could be gearing itself up for a fireworks display that doesn't even happen. Despite some indications that special counsel Robert Mueller could be wrapping up, there has been no official word from the Justice Department confirming that's so.

President Donald Trump speaking into a podium mircophone.
Susan Walsh / Associated Press

Members of Vermont's congressional delegation are speaking out after President Donald Trump declared a national emergency Friday morning to fund a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

Calling it "a great thing to do," President Trump declared a national emergency on Friday in order to help finance a long-promised wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. It's a highly unusual move from an unconventional president.

Spending negotiators may have reached an agreement on an outline to avoid a government shutdown, but the final legislation is still incomplete less than three days before the Friday deadline.

Updated 4:14 p.m. ET

President Trump said on Tuesday that he's not "happy" with a potential budget deal being worked out by congressional negotiators but added that he doesn't think there will be another partial government shutdown.

President Trump delivered a wide-ranging State of the Union address Tuesday night that went an hour and 21 minutes. That's the third-longest ever.

So what should we make of Trump's third address to Congress, and in a year when Democrats are gearing up for a crowded primary to decide who will face Trump in 2020?

1. Trump did not acknowledge the new political reality in Washington

Stacey Abrams standing on a stage, looking to the right.
John Amis / Associated Press

Following the president's annual State of the Union address Tuesday night, Georgia politician Stacey Abrams delivered the Democratic response.

The U.S. Capitol Building at sunset.
Alex Brandon / Associated Press

The president's annual State of the Union address — which had been delayed this year because of the partial government shutdown — took place Tuesday night.

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