Education

The home for VPR's coverage of education issues and policy in Vermont.

The Education Team

Follow VPR reporters Amy Kolb Noyes and Howard Weiss-Tisman on Twitter for the latest on education issues across Vermont.

Explore our coverage by topic or chronologically by scrolling through the list below

Act 46 | Kids & Parenting | University Of Vermont | Vermont Legislature | Agency of Education

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Suresh Garimella talks to reporters.
Sawyer Loftus / VPR

The University of Vermont has selected Dr. Suresh Garimella as its next president. The board of trustees Friday morning authorized its chair to negotiate a contract with Garimella.

Updated at 3:13 p.m. ET

A critical new report from the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Inspector General finds the department's student loan unit failed to adequately supervise the companies it pays to manage the nation's trillion-dollar portfolio of federal student loans. The report also rebukes the department's office of Federal Student Aid for rarely penalizing companies that failed to follow the rules.

We're talking about the closing of Green Mountain College in Poultney.
Nina Keck / VPR

After weeks of rumors flying among students and faculty, administrators announced that Green Mountain College in Poultney would close in May. Now, layoffs are already starting and the impact of the closure is being felt well beyond campus. We’re talking about the College's closing, the effects on the surrounding community and the next steps for all involved.

Nina Keck / VPR

In the year since Jack Sawyer was arrested for allegedly plotting to shoot up Fair Haven Union High School, improving school security has been a statewide priority. 

Many believe school resource officers play an important role - patrolling the hallways and forming relationships with students.

But some school districts are having trouble finding them.

Burlington City Hall on a winter afternoon with the U.S. and city flags blowing in wind.
Meg Malone / VPR File

Not every kid learns best in a classroom, and five years ago Vermont began pushing school districts to find creative ways to reach more students and get them to graduation. In Burlington, the school is encouraging some students to learn more about their own city and the lake that runs alongside it.

Cassidy

Teachers, family members, employers - and in fact almost anyone who interacts with other people - have more power than they can imagine, to hurt or to support, and most of the time we’re unaware of the effect we have on others. So I was astonished when a former student contacted me out of the blue to tell me that in going through her father’s papers she’d found reports from when she attended Brattleboro Union High School.

Testimony is heard on the House floor.
Toby Talbot / AP

This week House lawmakers gave an extension to some—but not all—school districts that have yet to merge under Act 46, giving some districts as much as an additional year to comply with the state's school district merger mandate.

House lawmakers approved an amendment Thursday that would give some school districts an extra year to comply with a district consolidation mandate.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR file

House lawmakers have decided that some Vermont school districts need more time to comply with a merger mandate, but they’ve left a fast-approaching deadline in place for others.

An aerial shot of the House floor on the opening day of the Vermont Legislature in 2019.
Oliver Parini / For VPR

House lawmakers appear poised to grant a yearlong reprieve to about half of the Vermont school districts that face a fast-approaching deadline for complying with a controversial school governance mandate.

A building on the Green Mountain College campus
Nina Keck / VPR

My private college tuition in 1968 was $2,800, 50 years later it’s $50,000. Meanwhile, state support for public colleges has diminished and educational value has changed both for better and for worse.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The Department of Health has offered free radon tests for any school in Vermont since 2001, but so far less than one third of the schools have tested their air.

Ethan Foleu, president of the UVM Student Government Association.
Ethan Foley, Courtesy

Students at the University of Vermont want to create an on-campus food pantry. The request follows a recent UVM survey showing that one in five undergraduate students at the university are not getting an adequate level of nutrition.

Dr. Suresh Garimella
Courtesy of Purdue University

The University of Vermont could soon have a new president. The school announced that the "sole finalist" for the position, Dr. Suresh Garimella, will visit campus next week.

A lunch from Crossett Brook Middle School in Duxbury features whole-grain spaghetti with meat sauce, local apple, salad, broccoli, and a roll.
Vermont Agency of Education

Vermont schools offer free or reduced-cost meals to thousands of students every day. But how did schools become the venue to enact food policy? We're looking at school meal programs and the role they play in nutrition and education in school today.

Stowe is one of about 30 school districts in Vermont challenging a state law that requires them to merge with other districts. House lawmakers will vote next week on whether to delay that merger mandate, to give the court case time to resolve.
Ian Noyes / VPR file

The Vermont House of Representatives will vote next week on postponing implementation of a controversial school governance law.

Amy Mulherin, a teacher in the Winston Prouty toddler program in Brattleboro, gets two of her students dressed to go outside and play in the snow.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

High-quality child care in Vermont can be tough to find and tougher to afford. And elected officials from the governor on down seem to agree that this is a serious problem for the state. So what's being done to address the issue? We're looking at the state of child care in Vermont. And going through some of the ideas on the table to make that care more accessible and affordable.

A group of students gather around a laptop computer
Meg Malone / VPR

The historical novel Refugee weaves the stories of three refugee families fleeing their homes in different parts of the world and during different time periods: Germany in the 1930s, Cuba in the 1990s and Syria just a few years ago.

Keck

Rumors had been flying for months, but now it’s official. Green Mountain College is closing its doors at the end of this semester.

Brian Schwartz in his Green Mountain Technology and Career Center classroom surrounded by firefighting gear.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

A shipping container filled with firefighting gear and school supplies from Vermont will soon make its way to Tanzania. It’s the result of a high school service learning trip last summer.

Vermont Health Commissioner Mark Levine speaks to Senate Education Committee while seated at a table and others gathered around.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

After saying it could take three years to test the drinking water at every school in Vermont for lead, the Department of Health now says it will finish testing by the end of the year.

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