Insurrection At The Capitol

U.S. Capitol Police requested a 60-day extension for a portion of the National Guard troops currently in Washington, D.C., Thursday as the threat of a possible attack from militia groups looms over the city.

Updated at 6:41 p.m. ET

FBI Director Christopher Wray on Tuesday condemned the attack on the U.S. Capitol as "domestic terrorism," defended the bureau's handling of intelligence about potential threats ahead of the event and rejected conspiracy theories blaming left-wing extremists for the violence on Jan. 6.

Updated 12:59 p.m. ET

Former U.S. Capitol Security officials told Congress during a joint hearing on Tuesday they did not have sufficient information ahead of Jan. 6 to accurately predict the scale of the attack.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced plans for Congress to establish an outside and independent commission to investigate "the facts and causes" related to the attack on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.

In a letter sent to her Democratic colleagues on Monday, the California Democrat said the commission will be modeled on the commission established after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

The first three days of the Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump went about as well as they could have for Democratic House impeachment managers.

The managers were methodical and organized in showing, as they called it, Trump's "provocation," which they argued led to the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, as well as the "harm" it caused.

On Wednesday, House impeachment managers had senators riveted to disturbing new security camera video that showed just how close the rioters that breached the U.S. Capitol came to lawmakers in the House and Senate chambers.

Wednesday's images, from several angles outside the chambers and in hallways outside leadership offices, showed one Capitol police officer run past Utah Republican Sen. Mitt Romney and direct him to turn around and run, as rioters were closing in on that location just off the Senate floor.

barbed wire and steel fencing in front of the U.S. Capitol building
Rebecca Blackwell / Associated Press

Following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, extreme security measures are in place ahead of Wednesday's inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden. One Dartmouth security expert who normally studies election-related violence and extremism outside the U.S. is now using that knowledge to frame what's happening here.

Updated at 3:50 p.m. ET

Federal investigators say they have arrested several alleged members of extremist and white supremacist groups who participated in the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol building, including multiple participants in an alleged conspiracy.

People allegedly affiliated with organizations such as The Three Percenters, The Oath Keepers, Proud Boys, Texas Freedom Force, and other self-described Nazis and white supremacists were among the mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol building, according to federal investigators.

Police were on high alert in state capitals around the U.S. Sunday, after warnings that pro-Trump extremists might attempt to storm legislatures similar to the assault on the U.S. Capitol last week. But at many statehouses and capitols, security and the media outnumbered protesters.

Photos: The Nation's Capital, Quiet And Guarded, Before Inauguration

Jan 18, 2021

Washington, D.C., is in defense mode ahead of Wednesday's presidential inauguration.

Armored vehicles and troops are positioned around the Capitol and other government buildings. Many streets are closed, as authorities brace for protests and potential violence from supporters of President Trump and extremist groups who are threatening another assault like the one at the U.S. Capitol Jan. 6.

National Guard soldiers have been arriving from all 50 states and three U.S. territories.

Despite warnings of armed demonstrations in state capitols over the weekend, Montpelier had a quiet Sunday. Plus, history, race, and the riot at the U.S. Capitol.

Orange cones and a black chain lead to four law enforcement officers on the snowy steps of the Vermont Statehouse
Elodie Reed / VPR

Updated 6 p.m.

Sunday was a mostly quiet day in Montpelier, and the armed protests that law enforcement officials had been preparing for did not materialize.

Next week's swearing-in of President-elect Joe Biden will see the biggest security presence of any inauguration in U.S. history. For days, thousands of National Guard troops have been pouring into the capital, and by Wednesday's ceremony, up to 25,000 troops will be in place to guard against security threats.

A green truck with supplies sits in front of the Statehouse in the snow
John Dillon / VPR

After extremists stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, the FBI has warned of similar efforts at state capitols in the coming days.

Governors across the nation are fortifying statehouses amid fears of possibly violent protests in the lead-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration on Wednesday.

People in a tree holding flags with a crowd below and the Washington monument in the background
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Are Vermonters treating the Capitol riot as an act of white supremacy? And is there a shift from how this predominantly white state has handled structural racism in the past?

Montpelier takes precautions in the days leading up to Joe Biden’s inauguration, and a reporter decides not to trespass in West Pawlet.

In late December, the New York Police Department sent a packet of material to the U.S. Capitol Police and the FBI. It was full of what's known as raw intelligence — bits and pieces of information that turned up by scraping various social media sites. It all indicated that there would likely be violence when lawmakers certified the presidential election on Jan. 6.

One week after a violent mob breached the U.S. Capitol, threatened lawmakers and forced evacuations, members returned to the House floor. What followed was an emotional, and often angry, debate about recrimination for the president who many argued incited the riot that resulted in five dead.

Peter Welch in a dark suit and light blue shirt and darker blue tie, with a blue face mask on
Screenshot / C-SPAN

House Democrats are voting today to impeach President Donald Trump on a charge of “incitement of insurrection” for last Wednesday’s storming of the U.S. Capitol by a pro-Trump mob. If the vote succeeds, Trump will be the only U.S. president in history to be impeached twice. But a constitutional scholar says impeachment isn’t the only way Trump could be punished by Congress.

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