Montpelier

Underhill residents gather at Town Meeting Day in 2018. "Vermont Edition" looks at how access to voting has changed in Vermont over time and how the question of "who gets to vote" continues to broaden.
Jim Beebe-Woodard

Town Meeting Day reminds Vermonters of how we vote in our unique form of local democracy, but the question of who gets to vote — in elections and at Town Meetings — continues to change. We're talking about how.

Portions of Main Street were submerged Saturday morning after a water main break sent water cascading into downtown Montpelier.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

A water main break in downtown Montpelier turned portions of Main Street into an icy river Saturday morning.

Closeup of crowd in winter gear gathered in front of the Statehouse in Montpelier for the 2019 Women's March rally.
Bayla Metzger / VPR

A large crowd gathered on the lawn in front of the Vermont Statehouse in Montpelier on Saturday for a Women’s March rally. The event was held in solidarity with marches around the country, in cities including Washington, D.C., New York and San Francisco.

The focus turns back to Montpelier as the Legislature convenes for a new biennium.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

When the gavel sounds, the new legislative session begins. Vermont Edition will be at the Statehouse as the 75th biennial session of the Vermont Legislature convenes, broadcasting live from the Cedar Creek Room.

Lawmakers this year will take up many of the same issues they debated in 2018, including paid family leave, a $15 minimum wage, and whether or not to tax and regulate cannabis.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Hundreds of people flocked to the Statehouse Friday to see the goddess of agriculture reclaim her perch atop the golden dome.

A stack of newspapers on a white background.
bernie_photo / iStock

Economic and political changes are staring down journalism professionals in ways that, while not necessarily new, pose complex new challenges. To examine this new landscape, the Friends of the Vermont State House and the Vermont Humanities Council will host a daylong journalism symposium Wednesday in Montpelier, called “Old News / New News / Real News / Fake News."

A hand holding up an I Voted sticker with an American flag.
Angela Evancie / VPR File

In 2014 — the last non-presidential election year — roughly 17 percent of Vermonters used the early voting system, according to the Vermont Secretary of State's Office. But this year, it's believed the number will double on a statewide basis and in some communities the rate will be considerably higher.

Winooski and Montpelier are exploring provisions that would allow their residents who aren't U.S. citizens to vote in local elections.
Jessamyn West / Flickr

There was a time when non-U.S. citizens could vote in elections where they resided in this country. But anti-immigrant feelings in the late 19th and early 20th century changed that. Winooski and Montpelier are now exploring ways to allowing their non-citizen residents to vote in local elections.

Wayside Restaurant owners Karen and Brian Zecchinelli show off some of their 100th anniversary swag. While they're celebrating all year long, a big ice cream social with fireworks is planned for July 29.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

This month, the Wayside Restaurant in Montpelier turns 100 years old. By serving up old-fashioned comfort food with a "made-in-Vermont" flair, it's one family restaurant that's found a recipe for success.

The emerald ash borer, an invasive insect, kills over 99 percent of ash trees. It's been found in Montpelier, and officials are planning a response.
U.S. Department of Agriculture

The invasive emerald ash borer has been found in Montpelier. City officials are taking steps to protect some trees along city streets, but ultimately they say most of Montpelier’s ash trees will die.

A groundbreaking ceremony was held at One Taylor Street, in Montpelier on Tuesday, May 29.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Construction will soon be underway on a multimodal transit and welcome center in Montpelier. It’s known as the One Taylor Street project — and it’s been a long time coming.

Vermont State trooper cars parked.
Steve Zind / VPR file

Vermont Attorney General TJ Donovan says no charges will be filed against the police officers who shot and killed an alleged bank robber in Montpelier in January.

The Vermont Statehouse on a blue-sky day, with people gathering on the lawn and some holding signs.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

On Saturday afternoon, protesters filled the lawn in front of the Vermont Statehouse — where just the night before, House lawmakers gave preliminary approval to a bill that would strengthen gun control laws in the state.

Updated at 3 a.m. ET Thursday

The U.S. women's hockey team owns Olympic gold for the first time in 20 years, after breaking Canada's remarkable streak of success in a gripping final at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. The only previous U.S. win had come in the tournament's first year, in 1998.

When the American women finally received their gold medals, they were placed on their necks by former player Angela Ruggiero, who was on the last U.S. Olympic team to win it all.

Montpelier High School's raising of a 'Black Lives Matter' flag has met with strong reactions across the country.
Ian Noyes / for VPR

The raising of a Black Lives Matter flag at Montpelier High School made news across the country and garnered a range of reactions from support to anger. We're talking about the deeper meaning of that symbolic action and how people have viewed it locally, statewide and nationally.

Ian Noyes / For VPR

Montpelier High School is flying a Black Lives Matter flag this month to mark Black History Month and that action has triggered some strong reactions. School administrators say the feedback, both positive and negative, has strengthened their resolve.

Montpelier High School's board has voted unanimously to fly the Black Lives Matter flag in February.
Jacquelyn Martin / AP

During the month of February, Montpelier High School will fly a Black Lives Matter flag outside the school.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Over a thousand demonstrators took over the streets of downtown Montpelier Saturday afternoon as they marched from City Hall to the Statehouse. Organizers are calling it the March for Our Future.

Stephen Mills / Times Argus

A robbery suspect killed by police Tuesday has been identified as 32 year-old Nathan Giffin of  Essex.

Giffin was killed in a standoff with police outside Montpelier High School.

A yoga class at the Montpelier Senior Activity Center. The class' instructor, Sarah Parker-Givens, says the class offers many health benefits for students.
Bob Kinzel / VPR

When it comes to health care, studies show that people over 65 use far more services than younger people, but some new research is pointing at ways to reverse that trend.

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