Public Safety

Will Lambek, Jose Luis Cordova Herrera, and woman who identified herself as Olga, from left, testified in the Legisalture last week. They say migrant farmworkers fear that local police will out them to Immigration and Customs Enforcement.
Jeb Wallace-Brodeur / The Times Argus

Civil rights groups say Vermont isn’t doing enough to prevent local police agencies from helping federal authorities identify and detain immigrants who are in the country illegally.

Close-up photo of cannabis plant
Yarygin / iStock

Vermont State Police have disbanded a decades-old program that used military helicopters to spot illicit cannabis farms from on high.

The exterior of the Randolph Police Department with a couple cruisers parked outside.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The town of Randolph lost its police department after each of the members left their positions over the course of 2018, and now the town is considering its options for the future of law enforcement.

shaunl / iStock

The Department of Fish and Wildlife wants to reminds all Vermonters — hunters and non-hunters alike — to take precautions and make sure everyone share the woods this fall.

Vermont's small-town ambulance departments, many run by volunteers, face increasing demands on time and resources. Some have even had to close their doors, including two departments in the Northeast Kingdom in the last year.
Andyqwe / iStock

Ambulance departments in rural areas of Vermont face growing costs and increasing demands of time and training. Some volunteer-run departments have been forced to close when those demands become too much to manage. We're looking at how Vermont's rural ambulance departments are meeting those challenges to make sure someone answers when Vermonters dial 911. 

State highway safety officials say increasingly aggressive drivers and texting while driving continue to plague Vermont's roads.
SHSPhotography / iStock

Vermont is seeing more cases of aggressive driving on its roads. And more drivers are using cell phones while driving, even though it's against the law.  We're talking with highway safety officials about how they're addressing these issues. 

A Vermont man charged with murder is arguing the 10th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution should protect him from facing the death penalty.
Michal Chodyra / iStock

Donald Fell was convicted in federal court of kidnapping Teresca King in Rutland in 2000 and killing her in New York state. He was sentenced to death, but his conviction was overturned due to juror misconduct.

As Fell awaits a new trial, his attorneys are working to avoid the possibility of him facing the death penalty again with unique arguments against The Federal Death Penalty Act, including one invoking the 10th Amendment to the Constitution.