Title IX

Protesters carry signs at a Chicago rally against sexual assault and rape culture in 2015.
Bob Simpson / Flickr Creative Commons

The U.S. Department of Education is proposing new rules for how sexual assault and harassment is handled on college campuses. The changes could limit the types of complaints schools can investigate and potentially allow live hearings where victims could be cross-examined.

The department says it's to protect both accusers and the accused, but victim advocates fear the changes could discourage victims from reporting abuse.

University of Vermont sophomore Syd Ovitt stands in front of a mural holding a sign that says Explain The Asterisk.
Bayla Metzger / VPR

When a college student is found guilty of sexual assault, many schools won’t note it on their academic transcripts. University of Vermont sophomore, Syd Ovitt, has launched a campaign to change this, and legislators are paying attention.

Title IX has been a federal law since 1972. We look at what progress women have made on campus and in business because of the law.
Stockce / iStock

On June 23, 1972, Title IX went into effect, mandating the equal treatment of all students, regardless of gender, in education programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance. So how much have education and professional opportunities for women improved in that time?