Transportation

Vermont is aiming to have 50,000 electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles on its roads by 2025.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press/File

Right now, there are about 3,000 electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles on Vermont's roads. But that's a far cry from the 50,000 the state hopes will be traversing our highways and byways by 2025. We'll hear about why some Vermonters have already made the switch to electric and what's keeping others from plugging in.

A sign for the Rutland Southern Vermont Regional Airport sign
Nina Keck / VPR File

Two regional airlines are competing to provide passenger service for Rutland Southern Vermont Airport — and both companies promise state-of-the-art planes.

The federal government is expanding an investigation into malfunctioning air bags to include an additional 12.3 million vehicles with air bags that could fail to inflate in a crash.

A partial view of a care tire set against a black background.
nicolas_ / iStock

The Agency of Transportation wants Vermont to be a testing site for self-driving cars, but there’s a debate in the Statehouse right now over how much oversight towns should have when the technology is tested on public roads.

Overflow from the White River runs over a road near the village of Royalton.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Drivers across the state had to make alternative plans Monday after a night of heavy rain and snowmelt flooded riverbanks, sending water across the roadways.

Honda has recalled more than 1 million Acura and Honda vehicles in the United States with air bag inflators that, if deployed during a crash, could explode and shoot pieces of sharp metal at the driver and passengers the safety feature is intended to protect.

A stretch of road in Plymouth, Vermont, with a 35 miles per hour speed limit sign on the right and a car approaching in the distance.
Emily Corwin / VPR

This winter's freeze/thaw cycles have been hard on Vermont roads. That's because when moisture gets into cracks then freezes, it causes potholes and frost heaves.

McCallum

Winter’s sudden arrival this fall marked the end of a large road paving project in my town. The resurfacing of a two-lane state highway that stretches forty-two miles from Rockingham to just south of Rutland is a busy corridor, and the project that slowed traffic to a halt all spring and summer led to more than a few frayed nerves.

A view from near the back window of a car looking at oncoming traffic and moving toward going under a bridge.
Gene J. Puskar / Associated Press File

There's been a lot of hype over the years about the future of autonomous vehicles – though mostly in cities, like San Francisco. But Joe Segale, the Vermont Agency of Transportation's director of policy, planning and research, would like to see self-driving cars being tested on Vermont roads.

A test of AllEarth Rail's individually-powered rail cars at a demonstration in Barre.
AllEarth Rail, courtesy

The future of Vermont rail often looks north to Canada and the reintroduction of The Montrealer for passenger service between Vermont and Quebec. But a Burlington company is aiming to expand rural commuter rail service within the state with individually-powered rail cars that could restart local rail service between communities across the state.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The Agency of Transportation is installing a suicide prevention fence on the Quechee Gorge Bridge.

And for one family it marks the end of years of advocating for the safety measure.

Nina Keck / VPR

For residents of Brandon, the past year has been filled with noise, dust and the steady hum of roadwork. It’s part of a nearly $30 million infrastructure upgrade that’s remaking the town both above ground and below.

State highway safety officials say increasingly aggressive drivers and texting while driving continue to plague Vermont's roads.
SHSPhotography / iStock

Vermont is seeing more cases of aggressive driving on its roads. And more drivers are using cell phones while driving, even though it's against the law.  We're talking with highway safety officials about how they're addressing these issues. 

The border crossing at Derby Line, Vermont and Stanstead, Quebec is one of several separating the U.S. and Canada.
Charles Krupa / Associated Press/File

The border at the 45th parallel separates two countries but also unites the cultures of Vermont and Quebec. Many families have relatives on both sides of the border, so changes in transportation services on one side also affect the other. We're looking at some of the changes in rail, road and air travel in Vermont and Quebec.

Angela Evancie / VPR

You know the feeling. You’re driving along, somewhere in Vermont, and you turn onto a road with an intriguing name. And you wonder where it came from.

Jessica Keene stands on the Quechee Gorge Bridge in front of a sign she made that reads, "Step back. You're worth it." The card also has the phone number for the national suicide prevention hotline.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Two local women are putting up index cards, with messages of support and hope, in an attempt to reach anyone who might be contemplating suicide on the Quechee Gorge Bridge.

At a meeting in Hartford, a roomful of people listen to VTrans project manager JB McCarthy talk about plans to install a temporary fence on the Quechee Gorge bridge.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The Vermont Agency of Transportation says it wants to have a temporary fence up on the Quechee Gorge Bridge before the middle of September to try to cut down on any more suicides at the popular tourist attraction.

Work continues this year on moving and widening the taxiways at Burlington International Airport.
Shirley Chevalier / Courtesy of Burlington International Airport

There's a lot of construction going on at Burlington International Airport right now, plus a surge in traffic. Nicolas Longo, deputy director of aviation administration at BTV, joined Vermont Edition to talk about what's changing (taxiways are, runways aren't) and where the big bump in passenger volume is coming from. 

"Vermonters don't stand for that," said Attorney General TJ Donovan of Volkswagen's emissions cheating.
Henry Epp / VPR

Vermont has secured an additional $6.5 million from Volkswagen and its affiliates Porsche and Audi.

The town of Colchester is closing the causeway while it assesses damage caused by a storm on Friday.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

Cyclists have cause for celebration: A group of organizations plans to re-open the Colchester Causeway in early July, and with it, the Island Line Bike Ferry.

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