VPR Classical

All Images Public Domain - Collage by James Stewart

We are continuing to celebrate the life and music of J.S. Bach and Chopin, listening to excerpts from a recent concert I hosted with pianist Paul Orgel in VPR’s Stetson Studio One while also featuring highlights from an interview I had with pianist and Chopin scholar Marjan Kiepura. You can listen to all of Paul Orgel’s performances from “The Alchemy of Genius” pairing Nocturnes by Chopin with excerpts from Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier Book II here.

Marjan Kiepura - used with permission

We’re spending the next few episodes celebrating the life and music of J.S. Bach and Chopin. In this episode we’ll look at Chopin specifically and we’ll also have some help…

All Images Public Domain - Collage by James Stewart / Vermont Public Radio

We celebrate Chopin’s birthday on the first day of March and J.S. Bach’s on the last. So, on Timeline we’ll be spending this month exploring the life and music of these two influential composers.

Paul Orgel, pianist

Mar 1, 2019
Paul Orgel - used with permission

Pianist Paul Orgel joined forces with Vermont Public Radio to create a project called "Alchemy of Genius," pairing selected Nocturnes by Frederic Chopin with Preludes and Fugues by J.S. Bach from The Well-Tempered Clavier Book II. All of the recordings plus some insights into these two composers and their works are available here.

All images U.S. Public Domain - Collage by James Stewart / Vermont Public Radio

The idea for this project was brought to VPR by Paul Orgel, a well-known Vermont pianist, and a regular guest on our Live Performance Series starting back on Walter Parker’s show in the 1980s, when the studio was in Windsor. Performing the complete Chopin Nocturnes and Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier Book II are both projects of Paul’s, and we were delighted to have him play and record some of them on our wonderful, still new, Steinway D that he and pianist Simone Dinnerstein helped choose for the station at the Steinway factory in New York.

Brian E Kushner / ISTOCK

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart loved birds. His letters to family and friends mention several pet canaries he had during the course of his life, but the most famous bird Mozart ever owned was his beloved starling.

Timeline: Qualia

Feb 18, 2019
James Stewart

Listening to music is an emotional experience, unique to each individual. I think we’ve all had a moment when a song, a piece, a singer, a band, an orchestra has touched our hearts, moved us in some way. We also realize that it’s not the same for everyone; different music speaks to different people. We can try to describe the way music makes us feel but I wonder if it’s even possible to really know how music effects someone else.

Helen Lyons will share music on VPR Classical weekday mornings from 7-10 a.m.
Daria Bishop / For VPR

Vermont Public Radio has named Helen Lyons as VPR Classical’s morning host. Lyons will share classical music with listeners weekday mornings from 7-10 a.m. beginning February 13.

Timeline: Pareidolia

Feb 11, 2019
U.S. Public Domain

In the past couple of episodes we’ve looked at quite a few audio experiments or illusions, exploring the limitations and wonderful abilities of our ears and mind. I’ve been joined by some friends from VPR, Brendan Kinney, Leslie Blount and Joe Tymecki. They volunteered to take part in these experiments and share their experiences with us.

tomazl / ISTOCK

Our ears and minds are amazing. Not only can they hear and experience the world around us, they are also filling in the gaps in our perception. We don’t even realize all the ways that our hearing is constructing the world around us, helping to keep us safe and understand our surroundings.

U.S. Public Domain

We are wired to respond to sound in a thousandth of a second. With that kind of visceral, automatic response we sometimes get it wrong. I’ve been looking at the research of perceptual and cognitive psychologist Diana Deutsch. She has spent her career exploring and assembling audio illusions and curiosities. We’ll look at a few of them together and ask “can you trust your ears?”

Timeline: Earworms

Jan 7, 2019
Bobboz / ISTOCK

Have you ever had a song that you just couldn’t get out of your head? You’re not alone. 98% of people have reportedly experienced this phenomenon. Scientists call it "Involuntary Musical Imagery" but the more catchy title is "earworm."

U.S. Public Domain

Music has always been used as a tool in political campaigns.

U.S. Public Domain - collage by James Stewart

Music surrounds us all the time. It’s everywhere. Whether you’re at a restaurant, the grocery store, doctor’s office, hotel lobby or even some manufacturing facilities there always seems to be background music playing. Why? Why is it there? Where did this practice come from?

VPR Classical's Timeline program is starting a new series on music and the mind.
VPR

VPR Classical has been airing the Timeline series since 2015. The thought-provoking, bite-sized explorations of the development and history of Western music are the brainchild of James Stewart, the afternoon host for VPR Classical. Now, he's producing a series of new Timeline episodes with a specific focus on music.

U.S. Public Domain

Thanks to the 1940 film Fantasia the music of The Sorcerer's Apprentice will always be tied to the image of Mickey Mouse in that droopy wizard’s cap. However, that story doesn’t come from Disney. Paul Dukas’ music, written over 40 years before, tells the tale beat for beat of a young apprentice using magic to get out his chores. But it wasn’t even Dukas’ story to begin with; the music is based on a poem by Goethe written in 1797.

This holiday season, make VPR and VPR Classical part of your celebrations! Enjoy a variety of traditional and new programs and music.
Marcus Lindstrom / iStock

This holiday season, make VPR and VPR Classical part of your celebrations! Enjoy a variety of traditional and new programs and music, a special holiday playlist from VPR Music, VPR Classical's "Messiah Watch" and more.

A statue of George Frideric Handel is pictured here at night in Halle, Germany.
IgorGeiger / iStockphoto.com

The season for George Frideric Handel's Messiah is upon us! Although it was actually first performed around Easter, in our time it has become a December holiday tradition.

This year, VPR is again rounding up performances and sing-alongs of Handel's beloved oratio in our area. 

U.S. Public Domain

Art is everywhere and always has been. It lines the walls of museums, buildings and caves. It fills our halls and ears with sound and music. It captures the eye with beautiful movement and imagery. Art doesn’t just express our passions and history; it defines, influences and shapes culture and civilization.

U.S. Public Domain - collage by James Stewart

When my kids were infants I remember being told to be sure and play music for them during the day, at naptime and while they were asleep. The music had to be Mozart. Mozart was the key to making them smarter. Maybe you’ve heard of this before, the so-called “Mozart Effect.”

Pages