VPR News

Special Counsel Robert Mueller walks past the White House on Sunday, March 24, 2019, just days after delivering his findings in the Russia investigation and the Trump presidential campaign.
Cliff Owen / AP

The findings from Special Counsel Robert Mueller mean talk of impeaching President Trump are likely over, according to Garrett Graff, a Vermont-based reporter who’s followed Mueller's career for years. 

The Beta Technologies prototype Ava XC lands during a test flight at the Plattsburgh International Airport.
Eric Adams / Courtesy Beta Technologies

This special Vermont Edition collects recent interviews that highlight technological innovations being developed in our area. We'll hear about cutting-edge cartography, a tactile sketchpad that helps blind students in subjects that require graphing and an electric air taxi.

A stethoscope on a table with paperwork in the background.
SteveColeImages / iStock

A new report from the Office of Professional Regulation says that Vermont would benefit in a number of ways from joining a multi-state nursing compact, but acknowledges such a change would also have financial impact.

VTel CEO Michel Guite
Steve Zind / VPR File

Tens of millions of taxpayer dollars have gone toward bringing high-speed internet to the small towns and backroads of Vermont. But one project, a wireless system built by Springfield-based Vermont Telephone Company, has not yet delivered what was promised.

Special counsel Robert Mueller's work is done, but the Russia imbroglio likely has a few more encores before the curtain closes.

Attorney General William Barr notified Congress on Sunday of a huge milestone in the saga: Mueller has submitted a report that did not find that President Trump's campaign conspired with the Russians who interfered in the 2016 election.

Updated at 6:56 p.m. ET

Special counsel Robert Mueller did not find evidence that President Trump's campaign conspired with Russia to influence the 2016 election, according to a summary of findings submitted to Congress by Attorney General William Barr.

"The Special Counsel's investigation did not find that the Trump campaign or anyone associated with it conspired or coordinated with Russia in its efforts to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election," Barr wrote in a letter to leaders of the House and Senate judiciary committees on Sunday afternoon.

Leaders of the Justice Department have sent a summary of Robert Mueller's main findings to key members of Congress. The special counsel's office completed its investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election on Friday.

Sen. Patrick Leahy talks to reporters at Burlington International Airport Sunday. Leahy says he wants Robert Mueller's report into alleged Russiona interference in the 2016 election to be released in its entirety to Congress and the public.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Attorney General William Barr may have unveiled top-level findings from Robert Mueller’s report into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, but Sen. Patrick Leahy says he won’t be satisfied until the special counsel’s full report is released to the public.

Updated at 7:46 p.m. ET

Attorney General William Barr received a report on Friday by special counsel Robert Mueller about the findings from Mueller's investigation into the Russian attack on the 2016 presidential election.

A picture of narcotics seized by police. Some Vermont lawmakers want to decriminalize possession of buprenorphine, an opioid that's often used to treat substance use disorder.
AP/Toby Talbot

The House Judiciary Committee has approved legislation decriminalizing possession of buprenorphine. But some law enforcement officials say non-prescribed use of the drug, which is used to treat opioid use disorder, should remain a crime.

We're talking about the debate over life without parole in Vermont.
powerofforever / iStock

Life in prison with no chance of parole is the harshest punishment possible in Vermont. Some see it as a necessary sentence for the worst crimes, whiles others see it as an unforgiving punishment devoid of hope for rehabilitation. We're talking about what life without parole means for public safety, rehabilitation and deterrence, and for the cost of the justice system in Vermont.

Warmer winters mean ticks are taking a toll on the moose population. We're featuring some of our recent coverage of the local impacts on climate change.
Elliot Black / flickr

Vermont Edition is featuring some of our recent coverage of climate change on our region - including significant changes for weather, wildlife and agriculture. Plus: discussion of what we can do on local and global levels to combat climate change and effectively deal with its effects.

Take a look at a class roster at the University of Vermont. You'll see the usual stuff there — last name, student ID and class year. But you'll also see something else. Next to some names, there are pronouns: "he" or "she," but also the gender non-specific "they" or "ze."

They may seem like a few more words on paper, but for some students, like Jeane Robles, having pronouns on the roster means a lot.

Men are dying after opioid overdoses at nearly three times the rate of women in the United States. Overdose deaths are increasing faster among black and Latino Americans than among whites. And there's an especially steep rise in the number of young adults ages 25 to 34 whose death certificates include some version of the drug fentanyl.

The melty weather in New Hampshire this winter has been a big problem for some kinds of seasonal recreation -- and it’s all part of a long-term warming trend.

As this season comes to an end, some of the region's favorite pastimes are preparing for an uncertain future.

Windblown Cross Country Skiing and Snowshoeing is tucked into the hills of New Ipswich, New Hampshire, not far from the Massachusetts border.

Stevanovicigor / iStock

Over the course of what’s now adding up to nearly a lifetime in Vermont, I’ve enjoyed being active in various cultural, civic and business organizations, including the ACLU. And at times, I’ve been called upon to advise state leaders from college presidents to corrections officials. So it’s from this perspective that I say with considerable confidence that it’s time to close the South Burlington Women’s facility, or CRCF.

Forest therapy guide Duncan Murdoch takes in his surroundings in Arms Forest in Burlington.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

Forest bathing is an English interpretation of the Japanese term shinrin-yoku and it is the idea that spending time in nature in an alert but relaxed manner has healing and rejuvenating benefits. But why, in a state where many Vermonters already feel connected to the natural landscape around them, would someone pay to go on a forest bathing excursion with a forest therapy guide? Vermont Edition went to find out.

Nina Keck / VPR

It’s been almost 50 years since there has been a hotel in downtown Rutland. Because of the recent federal government shutdown, it's taking longer than expected to find out if the city will get a new one.

A sign that says Welcome to the Childbirth Center and the Springfield Hospital logo, next to a black and white photo of an adult hand making a heart around baby feet.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The Springfield Hospital board of trustees voted Tuesday to close the hospital's child-birthing unit, as it tries to shave $6.5 million off this year’s budget.

Failure to recognize faces - even of those familiar to a person - is called prosopagnosia or face blindness and it affects about two percent of the population.
Missbobbit / iStock

Most of us take for granted the ability to recognize the faces of our friends and loved ones. But for about two percent of individuals, it isn't that easy. They have a condition called prosopagnosia or face blindness. Brad Duchaine, Dartmouth College professor of psychological and brain sciences, joins us to discuss the latest research in this field.

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