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Voices In The Week's News: November 15, 2013

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Charlotte Albright
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Nurse Jane Price at the Concord School

The town of Pittsford debated the best places for pre-schoolers to learn, the ratio of school nurses to students came under debate, Vermont officials discuss whether ratepayers across the region should foot the bill for power lines needed for southern New England, Alchemist Brewery announced it would close its retail location in Waterbury, and the Vermont Housing Finance Agency announced an increase in the income and purchase price limits for the mortgages it provides.

These were some of the voices in the news this week.

Pittsford Debates Best Place For Preschoolers To Learn, 11/14/13

(Pittsford resident Stacey Pearsons) “So you walk up to this little quaint, cedar shingled building," says Pearsons, "And it's all for these little kids and it's nestled in the woods. I call it preschool utopia. Why destroy that?”

Education Officials Are Asked To Maintain School Nurse Ratios, 11/12/13

(Jane Price, RN, Concord School) “I don’t have medicine for stomach aches. I do have my magic wand. Do you want to stay in school or go home?  Or what do you think?”

NE States Debate Sharing Costs For New Power Lines, 11/13/13

(Kerrick Johnson is vice president of the Vermont Electric Power Company (VELCO)) “If there is 150 mile transmission line from extreme northern Maine to move wind power down to Massachusetts or southern Connecticut, we don’t know that would benefit Vermont to a great degree,”

Don't Worry, The Elusive Heady Topper May Soon Be Easier To Buy, 11/09/13

(Alchemist Brewery Owner Owner John Kimmich) “Everybody will get more beer. All the places that we used to have to limit drastically the amount of beer that they got every week, those limits will go up considerably.”

VHFA Says New Limits Will Allow More Home Purchases, 11/11/13

(VHFA Policy and Planning Manager Maura Collins) "We wouldn’t want low income limits and super high purchase price limits that someone earning that income couldn’t afford."