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Wash Your Boat! Controlling The Spread Of Aquatic Invasive Species

A school of alewives circle in Nobleboro, Maine. This spring Lake Champlain saw a mass die-off of alewives because they are not suited for significant water temperature changes.
Robert F. Bukaty
/
AP
A school of alewives circle in Nobleboro, Maine. This spring Lake Champlain saw a mass die-off of alewives because they are not suited for significant water temperature changes. Their presence in Vermont threatens native fish species like lake trout.

Dozens of aquatic invasive species are already established in Vermont’s waters — from zebra mussels to milfoil to alewife. For swimmers and anglers, they’re a nuisance, but for our native aquatic life, their presence can cause dire consequences. We’ll discuss the threat of invasive species and why it's so challenging to prevent their spread.
Ellen Marsden, professor of Wildlife and Fisheries Biology in the University of Vermont’s Reubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, joins Vermont Edition to discuss the link between aquatic invasive species in the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain.

Shawn Good, Fisheries Biologist with the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department, will explain the challenges the state faces with preventing and controlling the spread of aquatic invasive species and what the average person can do to help.

Broadcast live on Thursday, April 25, 2019 at noon; rebroadcast at 7 p.m.

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